811 reputation
221
bio website ziga-lausegger.netau.net/…
location Slovenia
age 27
visits member for 2 years, 4 months
seen Feb 24 at 9:43

I love to program and crosscompile baremetal C programs for ARM based microcontrollers, I love physics and i love writing science documents/books in LaTeX. It amazes me how physics is connecting all science and is helping mathematics to evolve. In order for science profession to comunicate on a high level i advise everyone to use Linux, LaTeX and a good vector imaging program like Inkscape.


Sep
1
revised Kaon spontaneously splits into two pions (just need an confirmation)
added 275 characters in body
Sep
1
comment Kaon spontaneously splits into two pions (just need an confirmation)
Thank gosh! I am so happy now, because i think i understand this :). What about if the kaon would spolit into two different particles with different mass and speeds. Look at the EDIT.
Sep
1
asked Kaon spontaneously splits into two pions (just need an confirmation)
Aug
23
accepted Transition integral from 1-D cartesian into 3-D polar coordinate system
Aug
16
revised Transition integral from 1-D cartesian into 3-D polar coordinate system
edited title
Aug
16
revised Transition integral from 1-D cartesian into 3-D polar coordinate system
added 147 characters in body
Aug
16
asked Transition integral from 1-D cartesian into 3-D polar coordinate system
Aug
15
comment The probability of finding the electron in the H-atom
So this is the full probability... What if i was looking for $P d\theta$? Would i just have to remove the $\int\limits_{0}^{\pi}$?
Aug
15
comment The probability of finding the electron in the H-atom
I know if i want to get the full probability i need to calculate: $$P=\int\limits_{V}|R(r)|^2|\Phi(\phi)|^2|\Theta(\theta)|^2dV = \int\limits_{V}|R(r)|^2|\Phi(\phi)|^2|\Theta(\theta)|^2\,\,r^2dr\, d\theta \sin\theta d\phi=\\ =\int\limits_{0}^{\infty}r^2|R(r)|^2dr \int\limits_{0}^{\pi}|\Theta(\theta)|^2 \sin\theta d\theta \int\limits_{0}^{2\pi}d\phi$$ I hope i wrote that right and i think that this full integral should equal 1. But somehow it is still not clear to me how to get the $P(r)dr$... How can i interpret the $dr$ after the $P(r)$. What do you think of when you see something like it?
Aug
15
comment The probability of finding the electron in the H-atom
How do i do this?
Aug
15
comment The probability of finding the electron in the H-atom
Never mind i think i understand :)
Aug
15
comment The probability of finding the electron in the H-atom
I have one more question about this. Why did we use the diferential of volume when we are searching for $P(r)dr$
Aug
15
accepted The probability of finding the electron in the H-atom
Aug
15
comment The probability of finding the electron in the H-atom
Thank you very much. So if we are satisfied with a fraction of a probability there is no need to integrate :) What confused me was that feeling that if we want to integrate the equation we have to do it on both sides and not only one side... It is weird to me that we integrate just part of the equation.
Aug
15
asked The probability of finding the electron in the H-atom
Aug
8
asked Quantum tunelling problem - got a weird imaginary ratio in the end
Aug
7
comment Moving electron - finding the wavefunction
Thank you very much for the extended anwser. Now i do understand.
Aug
7
accepted Moving electron - finding the wavefunction
Aug
7
comment Moving electron - finding the wavefunction
Well the Lorentz invariance is a fundamantal equation of relativity and it says that $E=E_0$. If i then use $E=E_k$ to calculate constant $L$ it seems to me that i have violated the special relativity and everything Einstein wrote...
Aug
7
comment Moving electron - finding the wavefunction
I do not understand...