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Oct
10
comment How detectors in particle colliders can differentiate neutrons from antineutrons?
because anti-quarks in the anti-neutrons annihilate with the quarks in the protons and neutrons in the carbon nuclei while at such low energies, a neutron essentially behaves like an (unbreakable) ball
Oct
9
answered What are the main algorithms the LHC particle detectors use to reconstruct decay pathways?
Oct
9
answered How detectors in particle colliders can differentiate neutrons from antineutrons?
Oct
4
answered Use of fission products for electricity generation
Sep
29
comment How can I measure the speed of a figure skater's spin?
the stroboscope (or camera flash which has such a function) probably only works well if she can spin for a enough time while you adjust the stroboscope's frequency...
Sep
29
comment why are two higgs doublets required in SUSY?
see also physics.stackexchange.com/questions/116598/…
Sep
26
comment Why more than one Higgs?
Is there a typo here we don't want the theory to be renormalisable ?
Sep
23
revised Nuclear fusion using electromagnetic fields
added 717 characters in body
Sep
23
answered Nuclear fusion using electromagnetic fields
Sep
23
answered System without ground state is not real in nature?
Sep
7
revised Is the photoelectric effect a type of nuclear decay?
replaced 'induced gamma emission
Sep
7
comment Is the photoelectric effect a type of nuclear decay?
good point, so 'photonuclear reaction' is probably more adequate.
Sep
6
comment Is the photoelectric effect a type of nuclear decay?
The article on induced gamma emission I linked starts with the sentence: "In physics, induced gamma emission (IGE) refers to the process of fluorescent emission of gamma rays from excited nuclei". That's what the original poster was looking for as an analogy to the photoelectric effect, isn't it ?
Sep
6
revised Is the photoelectric effect a type of nuclear decay?
added 447 characters in body
Sep
6
answered Is the photoelectric effect a type of nuclear decay?
Aug
23
answered Ionization by heating
Aug
20
comment How does one experimentally determine chirality, helicity, spin and angular momentum?
actually, the original poster asked for fundamental particles which usually means that they are not composite.
Aug
20
comment How does one experimentally determine chirality, helicity, spin and angular momentum?
in fact, at least in the Standard Model to talk about chirality makes only sense for the fermions (or the sfermions in the MSSM which have spin 0), because chirality is defined by how the corresponding field/particle transforms under $SU(2)_\mathrm{L}$
Aug
18
comment What is the total kinetic energy per second of the particles accelerated by the LHC
Note that the 4 Terawatts counts each particle about 11'000 times (the number of revolutions per second). You could not exploit this power: if you were to fully absorb the energy of the particles (e.g. at the beam dump), the machine would be empty after one revolution.
Aug
18
comment Can lightly-ionized atoms be accelerated to relativistic speeds with current technology?
the ions in these accelerators are fully ionized, not lightly (for lead, this would be Pb 82+), the force exerted on the fully ionized ions is much larger than on the singly ionized while the mass (to be accelerated) of both is more or less the same.