5,543 reputation
11842
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location Atlanta, GA
age
visits member for 2 years, 8 months
seen 27 mins ago

I'm working on my PhD in aerospace engineering, specializing in computational turbulent combustion. My focus is primarily on massively parallel algorithms and computational methods for solving fluid and structural mechanics problems. Primary work is done in Fortran (90, 95, and 2003) but recent work has me branching into python, C and C++.

I'm also interested in international affairs and law.

Also interested in applying computational techniques to sports, in particular cycling aerodynamics and performance optimization. Particular emphasis on track cycling and time trialing.


2h
comment Best Research Documentation Habit for Computational Physics Research
Makefile? CMake is so much better...
12h
comment Norsk Hydro and heavy water - what was the perceived threat?
@akrasia The wikipedia article seems to indicate that graphite wasn't viable at the time and that both the French and Germans knew this, and knew that heavy water was needed. More details than that, and we'll have to hop over to history.SE to get answers.
12h
comment “Rocket in a box” thought experiment
Try to think about where the center of mass of the system is at all times throughout each case and you should be able to visualize what happens. A rocket just converts a solid or liquid to a gas, but the total mass of the original fuel and of the products is the same.
16h
revised Norsk Hydro and heavy water - what was the perceived threat?
Added a line that OP liked from my answer to make this answer complete.
16h
comment Norsk Hydro and heavy water - what was the perceived threat?
I'll gladly add that line to the other answer if that's the only deciding factor!
16h
comment Norsk Hydro and heavy water - what was the perceived threat?
Thanks for accepting my answer, but Floris' is better (more details that makes it more applicable to physics rather than history). I recommend choosing that one instead.
1d
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Gravity doesn't seem to work the way it is supposed to
1d
revised Time to inflate paddleboard given compressor output
The compressor required for cosmological inflation would need to be much bigger than 2.54 cu. ft/min...
1d
comment Gravity doesn't seem to work the way it is supposed to
I'm going to take a pretty big stab at this... but I think the question that's actually here isn't really what OP means to ask (based on the comments on the answers)... I think the question is "what makes gravity work" which is mixed up with the notion that rotation is required for a body to have a gravitational field. If I'm right, then this question should help out and you can ask more questions based on what you understand/don't understand: physics.stackexchange.com/questions/116608/…
1d
comment Gravity doesn't seem to work the way it is supposed to
I'm starting to think this question is much more subtle/advanced than the fictitious forces concept. Are you essentially asking what creates the gravitational force that we all feel?
1d
comment Model to convert radiation data from one tilted surface to a different one?
There is nothing unusual about answering your own question. That's why it's permitted!
1d
comment Why potential energy of external force on particle attached to spring is equal to full force multiplied by full displacement?
You're talking about two different things. In real life, of course not. In an idealized text-book problem, yes. You're trying to solve the latter but thinking of it like the former.
1d
comment Why potential energy of external force on particle attached to spring is equal to full force multiplied by full displacement?
I'm still confused about what you're asking... The external force is considered independent because it's an imposed force outside the system. We're making it independent. That's the boundary condition of the system.
1d
comment Mathematical model of a fluid: which viewpoint is the standard one?
Your first treatment is Lagrangian while the second is Eulerian in frame. It is possible to treat fluids in a Lagrangian fashion using particle methods such as Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics. But the particles aren't atoms/molecules/etc..
1d
comment Trying to make a realistic simulation of 'breaks' (Pool)
Also, the results will depend on the quality of your collision detection routines and your physics model -- there will be rotational component generated by the contact of the balls away from their centers of mass. So without more details about what physics your model includes, we can't really help you decide if adding more physics in the form of inelasticity will help.
1d
comment Trying to make a realistic simulation of 'breaks' (Pool)
Perhaps a picture would help demonstrate what you're showing, but I will ask this -- what makes you think that is the physically incorrect answer? I'm sure in an idealized world (and possibly real life), if you line things up exactly the way you have them, you would get the response you're getting (assuming, of course, your equations and code are correctly implemented!)
1d
comment Why do we fall down when the bicycle slows down?
@AkashLakshmanan There's only 1 downvote on the question, so perhaps you are referring to it being closed as a duplicate. That's not punishment and shouldn't be construed as anybody criticizing you. But it is the policy of the site that duplicate questions are marked as such. So there's no problem that you posted a duplicate (most of us didn't even know it was one either).
Aug
25
revised How to find tension in the cantilever brakes?
edited tags
Aug
25
comment Why do we fall down when the bicycle slows down?
This has been pretty conclusively dispelled as the reason why bikes stay upright. There is a contribution but the majority of the stability comes from the rider. This is why a rider can track stand (stand still without falling over). It's an inverted pendulum problem which could be made stable with appropriate controllers.
Aug
25
comment Why do we fall down when the bicycle slows down?
@JohnRennie That's why it should be downvoted -- the mouse over says "This question does not show any research effort;..." but it's perfectly clear and on-topic here. I'm not going to rant on Meta about it or anything, it's just my polite way of saying I disagree.