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location Atlanta, GA
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visits member for 3 years, 3 months
seen 54 mins ago

I'm working on my PhD in aerospace engineering, specializing in computational turbulent combustion. My focus is primarily on massively parallel algorithms and computational methods for solving fluid and structural mechanics problems. Primary work is done in Fortran (90, 95, and 2003) but recent work has me branching into python, C and C++.

I'm also interested in international affairs and law.

Also interested in applying computational techniques to sports, in particular cycling aerodynamics and performance optimization. Particular emphasis on track cycling and time trialing.


1h
comment The demise of the Tacoma Narrows bridge was casused by aeroelastic flutter. But isn't that just a special case of resonance?
I'm confused... why do you think aeroelastic flutter is anything other than resonance in the material caused by aerodynamic forces?
13h
comment Conceptualising the switch from discrete molecules to the continuum (fluid dynamics)
You may want to look up the Chapman-Enskog theory because it is what provides the bridge from the Boltzmann equation to the Navier-Stokes equations (ie. molecular->continuum). The wikipedia page is, unfortunately, very lacking on it though.
13h
comment What is the physical basis behind burnt calories estimates?
Regarding lactic energy consumption, my guess is that is a small component of the overall caloric output during aerobic exercise. Obviously for short interval training it is a much larger component. And there lies another caveat to the formulas used in exercise equipment -- even if it comes from the most accurate, scientific study, odds are good it is calibrated for longer-term aerobic work and not for intense, anaerobic work. I know my HR monitor reports it in calories/hour rather than giving an instantaneous estimate.
14h
comment What is the physical basis behind burnt calories estimates?
@Notachance I'm not an exercise physiologist so I don't know for certain. But temperature measuring could be done practically two ways -- first, put the person exercising in a small-ish enclosed space and measure the temperature change in the space as they exercise. Or, second, measuring their internal temperature (with sensors in the ear or less comfortable places, or by swallowing a capsule with a temperature sensor in it) and use thermal imaging cameras to measure skin temperature and radiation off the body.
2d
comment Creating a realistic simulation
For what it's worth, I know people who have gotten entire PhD's just by setting up a code (so figuring out algorithms, stability, etc) to look at 2 liquid droplets colliding. So yeah, it could be done, but it's not a "I was bored and decided to crank out some code" kind of topic.
2d
comment Engravings in “Wandering the Immeasurable” sculpture outside the CERN globe?
Plus, given the nature of physicists, it (and the decisions behind it) may actually be archived in a peer-reviewed journal somewhere.
2d
comment Engravings in “Wandering the Immeasurable” sculpture outside the CERN globe?
@Jimnosperm I dunno, I'm inclined to say it's on topic as it's looking for a very specific reference about something most people outside physics wouldn't even know existed (the LHC that is).
2d
revised Engravings in “Wandering the Immeasurable” sculpture outside the CERN globe?
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2d
awarded  Good Answer
2d
answered What is the physical basis behind burnt calories estimates?
2d
comment Gradient and curl of a field in polar coordinates
@Gerard It's a work in progress -- it's late! Or early, I guess, depending on perspective :)
2d
revised Gradient and curl of a field in polar coordinates
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2d
answered Gradient and curl of a field in polar coordinates
Mar
26
comment Could I break the sound barrier using circular motion? (And potentially create a sonic boom?)
@FastestManAlive It would depend on the shape of the fan and how powerful/fast the motor is but yes, you should be able to generate shocks at the tips. You might be disappointed if you are expecting loud claps of thunder though. It will probably just sound like really, really loud buzzing.
Mar
26
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
26
comment How to understand singularities in physics?
Not a duplicate, but very closely related: physics.stackexchange.com/q/167529
Mar
26
answered Could I break the sound barrier using circular motion? (And potentially create a sonic boom?)
Mar
25
comment How does anything move?
You could also just replace "positive" with "non-negative" and cover the $v = t^n$ case without changing the meaning of your answer.
Mar
25
comment How small does sand have to be to get wet?
Sad, while I was writing my answer, 2 new ones showed up that contain all the same information I had. :/
Mar
25
revised Why is mass per second constant in the Equation of continuity?
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