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location Atlanta, GA
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visits member for 3 years, 5 months
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I'm working on my PhD in aerospace engineering, specializing in computational turbulent combustion. My focus is primarily on massively parallel algorithms and computational methods for solving fluid and structural mechanics problems. Primary work is done in Fortran (90, 95, and 2003) but recent work has me branching into python, C and C++.

I'm also interested in international affairs and law.

Also interested in applying computational techniques to sports, in particular cycling aerodynamics and performance optimization. Particular emphasis on track cycling and time trialing.


1d
comment What speeds are “fast” enough for one to need the relativistic velocity addition formula?
@Ramashalanka much better, thanks for adapting to those of us who struggle :)
1d
comment What speeds are “fast” enough for one to need the relativistic velocity addition formula?
I cannot tell which of those lines is red and which is not. I don't know if it's because I'm colorblind (seriously, I am) or if it's because of the format/being on my screen. I know which one is which because I know what the functions look like, but for others who may not, could you remake the plot with either much thicker lines so the different colors are obvious or with a dashed line to make it very clear which one is which?
May
18
comment What are the minimum necessary conditions for a static shock to ignite wood or grain dust in the air and cause an explosion or fire?
FWIW, I think this is perfectly on topic here. I think the chemistry.SE would be more interested in the chemical kinetics involved than in the physical processes that lead to something ordinarily safe exploding.
May
18
comment What are the minimum necessary conditions for a static shock to ignite wood or grain dust in the air and cause an explosion or fire?
One could imagine those fireballs in a confined environment and the destruction that would cause. And it's also possible that grain silos also have some fermentation going on which would result in a dangerous mix of combustible gases. The Boston Molasses Flood may be one of the crazier explosions due to fermentation in a silo.
May
18
comment What are the minimum necessary conditions for a static shock to ignite wood or grain dust in the air and cause an explosion or fire?
This is a great question. If you want to see what it looks like, almost any fine-particulate matter will combust. Coffee creamer for example, and sawdust.
May
8
comment Why do we (3 dimensional creatures) see in 2 spatial dimensions?
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because this is about biology/perception and not physics.
May
7
comment What is the role of Tail section of a fixed-wing aircraft?
@JohnRennie Just because it can be on topic somewhere else, doesn't mean it is off topic here. And it also doesn't mean it should be closed. I'm not sure it's a good fit here in either case, but I don't agree with that close reason.
Apr
28
awarded  Notable Question
Apr
23
revised Turbulence and art
added 732 characters in body
Apr
23
answered Turbulence and art
Apr
21
comment How to solve highly oscillating differential equation
If you have to resolve the high frequency oscillations, you have no choice that I'm aware of. If, however, you only care about some time scale between the smallest and steady state, you can use an implicit scheme to avoid the stiffness problem and pick a time step that gives you adequate resolution of the highest-frequency mode you are interested in solving.
Apr
18
comment Which one is colder? Zero temperature ice or zero temperature water?
If you already know that metal feels colder than the wall because of conductivity, why don't you look up the conductivity of ice and water and answer this yourself?
Apr
17
comment Could Navier-Stokes equation be derived directly from Boltzmann equation?
Look up the Chapman Enskog equations.
Apr
16
comment Why does the lake surface appear darker in some areas?
I would agree with that from this image. I was just adding more possibilities that might happen in general.
Apr
16
comment Why does the lake surface appear darker in some areas?
It could also just be sudden changes in depth -- light water may have a sandbar under it or something. Or it could be due to difference in what is under water -- plants or dark rocks or something.
Apr
11
comment Tension and compression in bicycle wheel spokes - what holds the wheel in place?
Awesome update. The trispoke carbon wheels act as columns, like the old wooden wagon wheels, and not like the wire spokes. So those do behave entirely differently as you noted.
Apr
10
comment Tension and compression in bicycle wheel spokes - what holds the wheel in place?
The other way to think about it -- when you build a wheel (which is really fun, I like it a lot), you tension all of the spokes evenly and it's tensioned such that the bottom spokes "being compressed" are still in tension, just less tension than "uncompressed". In other words, let's say you tension everything to 10 units. Under weight, the spokes on the top will have a tension of 12 units and the spokes on bottom will have a tension of 8 units.
Apr
10
comment Tension and compression in bicycle wheel spokes - what holds the wheel in place?
No, that's not really how it works. @Floris covers it pretty well, it's very weak no matter how you look at it.
Apr
10
comment Tension and compression in bicycle wheel spokes - what holds the wheel in place?
And I would actually say "vanishingly small amounts" are supported by compression. It takes very little force to buckle a spoke in compression.
Apr
10
comment Tension and compression in bicycle wheel spokes - what holds the wheel in place?
Related question: physics.stackexchange.com/questions/94001/…