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location Atlanta, GA
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visits member for 2 years, 7 months
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I'm working on my PhD in aerospace engineering, specializing in computational turbulent combustion. My focus is primarily on massively parallel algorithms and computational methods for solving fluid and structural mechanics problems. Primary work is done in Fortran (90, 95, and 2003) but recent work has me branching into python, C and C++.

I'm also interested in international affairs and law.

Also interested in applying computational techniques to sports, in particular cycling aerodynamics and performance optimization. Particular emphasis on track cycling and time trialing.


Jul
16
comment Simulation of fluid flow using Euler equation
I would always recommend that you start learning a topic by finding a text book. Journal papers are very hard to learn a brand new topic from -- they are supposed to be communicating an advanced topic to experts in the field. Text books are meant to educate somebody to become an expert.
Jul
15
comment Can we 'see' the Kolmogorv microscale
@mart If you plotted the sum of multiple sine waves with random frequencies, could you tell from the plot what the highest frequency is? I don't think you can and it's the same issue here.
Jul
15
answered Can we 'see' the Kolmogorv microscale
Jul
14
comment How hot is aurora?
But sticking your hand in them would probably still hurt quite a bit from being in space...
Jul
13
comment Why do co-rotating vortices coalesce, but not counter-rotating ones?
Not enough for a full answer -- consider the pressure field between the vortex pair and the pressure outside of it. You get a Venturi type effect -- the same reason two boats moving side by side get sucked together.
Jul
12
comment How can a gas support tensile stresses?
@BrysonS. Who says a gas can support a negative pressure? It can support forces that reduce pressure, but never to 0.
Jul
12
comment Examples of nearly perfect fluids and gases
Well, we use the perfect gas assumption for the vast majority of fluid dynamics and we seem to be doing a pretty good job of getting the right answers... so there's a whole lot of examples of times where gases behave almost perfectly.
Jul
11
comment What is the Reynolds Number?
The human explanation would be exactly what's in the introduction section of Wikipedia. I don't see what is unclear about any of that.
Jul
10
comment Can we measure temperature of a object just by the sound it makes?
Do you mean that you do something like strike an object and measure the resulting frequency? Kind of like taking a tuning fork and heating it up then striking it and finding it's temperature knowing the new and original frequencies?
Jul
8
comment Calculate Euler equations of fluid dynamics without division?
How do you plan on dividing by cell volume? Or if you use the primitive system, how will you get $T$ from $e$ without dividing? It's a bit crazy to try and write an entire numerical code without using a single divide.
Jul
8
comment Irrotational fluid
Also, it should be noted that viscous potential flows do also exist...
Jul
8
comment Irrotational fluid
Related: physics.stackexchange.com/q/31179
Jul
8
comment A gas close to zero Kelvin
@KyleKanos It's more like a "pretty awesome gas." And in actuality, I've always kind of objected to considering it an entirely new state of matter. It's really just a slightly different already-existing state of matter. We don't have magnetic solids as a state of matter, why have magnetic gasses?
Jul
8
comment A gas close to zero Kelvin
@user48904 Fortunately we will probably never know since we can't every actually get to $0 K$ :)
Jul
8
comment A gas close to zero Kelvin
@KyleKanos Per wikipedia, " Like gas, plasma does not have a definite shape or a definite volume unless enclosed in a container; unlike gas, under the influence of a magnetic field, it may form structures such as filaments, beams and double layers."
Jul
8
answered A gas close to zero Kelvin
Jul
7
comment How do adhesive and cohesive forces affect surface tension?
@amlrg I think the differences in interpretation is a good reason to close it as unclear until the OP clarifies the intention.
Jul
7
comment How do adhesive and cohesive forces affect surface tension?
I'm likewise unclear on your terminology. Are you saying cohesive forces are oriented parallel to the interface and adhesive forces are perpendicular to the interface?
Jul
7
comment How do we define a sound source?
I think the way you were taught depends entirely on some underlying assumptions that aren't always required. Evanescent acoustic waves most certainly do exist (see for example section 13.2 for a discussion of how it occurs). But more to my other point -- if you blow gently through your lips (not whistle, just blow) there is most certainly sound generated. But nothing is remotely supersonic.
Jul
7
comment How do we define a sound source?
But by definition, acoustic waves can be evanescent. Are you trying to say that you are only interested in planar acoustic waves? How are you defining "sound"?