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location Atlanta, GA
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visits member for 2 years, 11 months
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I'm working on my PhD in aerospace engineering, specializing in computational turbulent combustion. My focus is primarily on massively parallel algorithms and computational methods for solving fluid and structural mechanics problems. Primary work is done in Fortran (90, 95, and 2003) but recent work has me branching into python, C and C++.

I'm also interested in international affairs and law.

Also interested in applying computational techniques to sports, in particular cycling aerodynamics and performance optimization. Particular emphasis on track cycling and time trialing.


1d
comment Inexplicable Results in a Vacuum Experiment
It's been long enough that it would be okay to give more detailed answers I think. I tried to ping you in chat to explain things back on 13 Nov but you had never been in chat so that didn't work. At any rate, my explanation is here.
1d
revised Fluid dynamics - immiscible liquids
edited tags
1d
comment Why to write the Navier-Stokes equation with dimensionless quantities?
My answer here might be useful: physics.stackexchange.com/questions/138598/…
2d
comment Should a Gaussian Curve Always Be Drawn Symmetrically?
I've gotta ask -- how do you have enough time on your hands to consistently answer questions with examples, codes, figures, detailed analysis etc? As always, nice work.
Nov
20
comment Lennard Jones potential is bad in my plot made with python
If that's your stance -- I don't see the equation you have in your code anywhere on Wikipedia. If your question is just "Is this formula right" then remove the code, add the MathJax for the formula you are attempting to use, and be ready for somebody to be upset that you didn't do enough research to find out the correct formula (other than check on Wikipedia). But looking at the code, that expression doesn't seem to match anything on Wikipedia -- making this a code-debugging exercise.
Nov
20
comment Lennard Jones potential is bad in my plot made with python
This question appears to be off-topic because it is about code debugging.
Nov
15
comment Isothermal compressibility
There's really nothing physics based going on in these definitions. It's completely algebra. If you know the definition of density then you should be able to see how to convert from one to the other.
Nov
15
comment Isothermal compressibility
Do you know the relationship between mass, density and volume?
Nov
14
comment Isothermal compressibility
Have you thought about what you could do to the equation to turn all your $V$'s into $\rho$'s?
Nov
14
comment Is it easier to simulate compressible flow than incompressible flow?
This is an opinion-based question. All I can really say that's factual -- solve the equations that govern the physics you are interested in studying. If you are looking at low Mach number flows, then the compressible equations will be "hard" to solve (the solver is the same complexity but it will take a really long time, or you have to modify the solver). If you are looking at not-low Mach number flows, then the incompressible equations will be wrong no matter how hard/easy they are.
Nov
14
comment Is more lift always better?
@Yandle I took the question to be about real, 3D problems since the only possible danger listed is "ripping the airframe apart" which would not be a concern if only 2D is considered. I could be wrong though, just wanted to add some food for thought!
Nov
13
answered Is more lift always better?
Nov
13
comment Inexplicable Results in a Vacuum Experiment
@AndréNeves It's driving me crazy I can't just post the answer but the harmonic oscillation direction is the correct way to go. You're on the right track and I would love to just blurt out what the answer is but I can't do that yet without breaking the site policies :(
Nov
13
comment Inexplicable Results in a Vacuum Experiment
@ThinkingSkeptically You may also want to plot your pressure on a log scale for the Y axis. Since you are looking at something that spans several decades, that may help you see the variation with time better. Also note how rapid the rise is compared to your sampling -- the "peak" you have is atmospheric, but do you think it's possible the sensor missed the real peak? What the sampling frequency of the sensor? How does sampling frequency relate to the values you are measuring?
Nov
13
comment Inexplicable Results in a Vacuum Experiment
@ThinkingSkeptically And so back to the point I was asking about the speed of the flow -- if you have a very large pressure jump what does that say about the flow? How does flow velocity relate to the pressure gradient in a fluid?
Nov
13
comment Inexplicable Results in a Vacuum Experiment
@ThinkingSkeptically My comment wasn't a critique on what you are asking -- just a reminder to not post an answer to those who are helping you understand the phenomenon.
Nov
13
comment Inexplicable Results in a Vacuum Experiment
@AndréNeves Since this is a homework question, let's be careful about how much we guide the answer. Not that we've crossed that line yet, but I have to keep reminding myself not to answer the question (and your previous comment as the answer to one is sort of the answer to the other).
Nov
13
revised Inexplicable Results in a Vacuum Experiment
edited tags
Nov
13
comment Inexplicable Results in a Vacuum Experiment
Also, "pressure drop" relative to what? What is your final expected pressure? Does your pressure peak overshoot the expected pressure or not?
Nov
13
comment Inexplicable Results in a Vacuum Experiment
Your expression for a viscous pipe flow -- what speed regime do you think that is valid to use? And what speed do you think the air entering the pipe will be at given your pressure ratios?