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Apr
21
reviewed Approve What really is the smallest “mass” or “object” in the universe?
Apr
20
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
14
reviewed Approve ising-model tag wiki excerpt
Apr
14
reviewed Approve ising-model tag wiki
Apr
6
awarded  Notable Question
Apr
4
awarded  Good Question
Apr
3
awarded  Enlightened
Apr
3
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
9
awarded  Nice Question
Mar
7
awarded  Popular Question
Feb
29
comment What is special about many-body localization as opposed to Mott insulator
Do you mean Anderson localization? That's the one you get due to disorder.
Feb
29
comment How does constant thrust avoid quadratic kinetic energy accumulation?
I don't think that quite answers the question; I think the question is more along the lines of "In time interval $(t_1, t_2)$, the kinetic energy change is $1/2 m a (t_2^2 - t_1^2)$ and as such clearly not merely a function of $t_2 - t_1$. And that would imply that the energy output of our "motor" needs to increase with time.
Feb
25
reviewed Approve Derivation of Schrodinger's wave equation
Feb
19
reviewed Approve Wrong calculation of work done on a spring, how is it wrong?
Feb
16
answered Bloch Functions as an implication of the Crystallographic Restriction Theorem?
Feb
15
reviewed Approve How do magnets work in classical electromagnetism?
Feb
15
awarded  Good Answer
Feb
13
comment Charge distribution on a line
So, instead of working on my thesis I looked more into this and can't find a simple way to solve this, so I did some googling and found this paper by EM god David J. Griffiths: colorado.edu/physics/phys3320/phys3320_sp12/AJPPapers/… Turns out there is no simple answer...
Feb
13
comment Charge distribution on a line
Hm, intuitively I'd start with your equality, bring the righthandside over and demand that this should be 0 exactly. Then interpret this as a function of X and compute the derivative. That will be a bit tricky because both the integral limits and the function inside the integral depend on $X$, so maybe you have to do it "by hand", by explicitly substituting $X + dX$ for $X$, expanding to first order in $dx$, then subtracting the $X$-only part. This should hopefully give a useful equation for $\lambda$.
Feb
12
reviewed Approve Magnets and speed of light