7,790 reputation
2543
bio website N/A
location Vancouver, Canada
age 29
visits member for 3 years, 8 months
seen Jul 21 at 16:35

Relevant for this page: Experience with Java, C/C++, OpenMP, MPI, Python, Lua Oh, and LaTeX, of course :)

Student of Computer Science and Physics at RWTH Aachen University.


Jul
9
answered spectral functions
Jul
9
asked Bound states and continua in the spectral function
Jul
2
awarded  Inquisitive
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jun
24
awarded  Popular Question
Jun
21
awarded  Good Question
Jun
9
answered Perturbation of an operator - Meaning of matrix element
May
27
comment Why does compressing a piston increase the internal energy?
@Emrakul Yes it does, as are all things in thermodynamics. But since we're dealing with so many particles, all these fluctuations average out.
May
27
answered How to interpret $t^2$?
May
27
reviewed Approve suggested edit on What is an $n$ dimensional space?
May
16
comment Why isn't it $E \approx 27.642 \times mc^2$?
But isn't it then a surprise that this ugly number that we call $c$ is also the speed of light?
May
16
comment Why isn't it $E \approx 27.642 \times mc^2$?
But MKSA wasn't explicitly invented to make $E = mc^2$ a prefactorless equation. It's not like the atomic units theorists use where $\hbar$ and $m_e$ and a bunch of other constants come out to $1$.
May
14
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Where did this equation come from ∠I+ ∠E = ∠A+ ∠D?
May
14
comment Effective Hamiltonian / Perturbation theory for non-degenerate case
Mh, I see. If the entire low-energy subspace is degenerate, then a good approximation is to set $z = E_0$ with $E_0$ the energy of the subspace without the perturbation. That way, you get an effective Hamiltonian that's energy independent. I was hoping for something similar but now with different energy levels in the subspace.
May
14
revised Effective Hamiltonian / Perturbation theory for non-degenerate case
added 253 characters in body
May
14
comment Effective Hamiltonian / Perturbation theory for non-degenerate case
While I appreciate the effort you put in this answer, it's not quite what I was looking for: First, it has to be solved self-consistently and second, I don't see how to generalize it to the case of highly degenerate levels. What I'm looking for is the "non-degenerate" equivalent to how, for example, Heisenberg exchange is derived via 2nd order perturbation theory...
May
13
asked Effective Hamiltonian / Perturbation theory for non-degenerate case
May
13
awarded  Popular Question
May
9
comment Subnuclear physics vs wave function
Let me add that when a particle physicist talks about a particle, they implicitly mean that it's a quantum particle and thus also a wave and also a quantum field. They most certainly don't treat it as a classical particle.
May
9
comment Subnuclear physics vs wave function
Well, for quarks and other subatomic processes, physicists use quantum field theory, which contains the wave model in the way Feynman diagrams work. As you mention, there are indeed interference processes, since the paths in the Feynman diagrams have a phase and can thus interfere constructively or destructively.