6,767 reputation
13069
bio website sklivvz.com
location London, United Kingdom
age 43
visits member for 3 years, 11 months
seen Oct 16 at 6:56

Stack Overflow Valued Associate

  • Contributor since September 15th 2008
  • Skeptics Moderator from February 2011 to March 2013
  • Core dev since March 2013

You can find me on

Some code of mine, mostly old :-)


Nov
6
answered Is energy really conserved?
Nov
6
answered What really allows airplanes to fly?
Nov
4
comment Why can you “suck in” cooked spaghetti?
I merely live in the UK ;-) Actually, if you need to suck in a spaghetti and you don't want to make a slurping noise, then you need an airtight seal. It's italian food bon-ton ;-)
Nov
4
answered What property of objects allow them to float?
Nov
4
comment How should a physics student study mathematics?
@Mark C - whatever your interpretation of the stackoverflow system is "too localized" is actually a valid reason for closing. Note that i just voted to close, and not closed. very big difference there. finally, i think i gave an explanation. you didn't like it, but that doesn't mean i didn't give one.
Nov
4
comment How should a physics student study mathematics?
Also the "Please do not rush your answer or try to be comprehensive." is flamebait, or at least meta- material!?
Nov
4
comment How should a physics student study mathematics?
not all university systems allow one to choose the curricula. not all university systems have undergraduate/graduate separation. i don't even know exactly what "adding a major" means. this said, the question has merit, and can be saved. note that university specific stuff is also sort of off topic. the basic question which has merit is: what approach/topics in maths are useful to study physics (or mathematical physics)? the rest of the question basically confuses me... i don't know how your university works (nor should i care).
Nov
4
comment How should a physics student study mathematics?
this question is too localized (US-ian)... please make it of international interest :-)
Nov
4
comment Why can you “suck in” cooked spaghetti?
Being Italian, I can assure you that sucking in a spaghetti with a completely airtight mouth works as expected. It's very messy because the sauce will slide off the spaghetti over your face, but it works. :-)
Nov
4
comment Intuitively, why is a reversible process one in which the system is always at equilibrium?
It has to do with how entropy relates to phase space. I know you will not like this answer, but the full explanation does not fit in this box. In short, entropy is related to specific "volumes" in phase space, and a very large system (such as a thermodynamic system) will necessarily evolve (when left to its own means with a non-equilibrium situation) towards larger and larger volumes of phase space which represent larger entropy. I will put together a more in-depth answer separately.
Nov
3
comment What new breakthrough energy technologies are close to being realized?
Anti-matter is not a way of producing energy, unless you have a "free" supply of anti-matter. At most it can be a way of storing energy.
Nov
3
comment Intuitively, why is a reversible process one in which the system is always at equilibrium?
Reversible changes must conserve entropy, since it can only stay the same or increase (2nd law of thermodynamics) and thus a change that increases entropy cannot be undone. Only changes that maintain equilibrium can conserve entropy because systems that are not in equilibrium are put in back in equilibrium by thermodynamic forces which increase entropy. It's not repeating the same thing over and over. ;-)
Nov
3
awarded  Critic
Nov
3
answered Is acceleration an absolute quantity?
Nov
3
answered Intuitively, why is a reversible process one in which the system is always at equilibrium?
Nov
3
awarded  Organizer
Nov
3
revised What is the difference between a measurement and any other interaction in quantum mechanics?
edited tags
Nov
3
answered What are good mechanics experiments for 10 year olds?
Nov
3
answered A force's magnitude
Nov
3
comment Law for tap water temperature
Nice answer, but it's still missing the transient. I don't understand why we need a model for the tube though. Shouldn't it simply heat up the solution you just provided?