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seen Apr 12 at 11:48

Mar
31
awarded  Critic
Mar
31
comment Explanation of Lorentz-Force
So you just trying to say that the electrons move along the wire? Sorry, but I don't see, how this is related to my question?
Mar
31
comment Explanation of Lorentz-Force
But why does it push the charge away from the sum and towards the difference (see my original question!)?
Mar
31
revised Explanation of Lorentz-Force
edited tags
Mar
31
comment Explanation of Lorentz-Force
There is only a scalar potential for the magnetic field if $\nabla \times \vec{B} = 0$ and the domain is simply connected. This isn't the case here because you have a current in the wire. By the way would you describe would then apply to a (hypothetical) magnetic monopol and not to an electron.
Mar
31
comment Explanation of Lorentz-Force
Thanks, but I don't see, how this solvs my problem. In the first part you are just citing the usual formula for the Lorentz force on a moving charge and using this to verify that the conclusion drawn in the book is correct in this case. But it doesn't really answer my question.
Mar
31
comment Explanation of Lorentz-Force
Sure, I know this relativistic argument, but I don't see, how it solves my question, which was to analyse the cited argument and not about another or better argument...
Mar
31
revised Explanation of Lorentz-Force
added 210 characters in body
Mar
31
revised Explanation of Lorentz-Force
added 177 characters in body
Mar
31
asked Explanation of Lorentz-Force
Mar
8
revised Reasons to consider the coefficient of restitution velocity independent - conditions when this does apply
added tag
Mar
7
revised Reasons to consider the coefficient of restitution velocity independent - conditions when this does apply
edited tags
Mar
7
asked Reasons to consider the coefficient of restitution velocity independent - conditions when this does apply
Feb
24
asked Why does Leyden jars have a high breakdown voltage
Feb
19
awarded  Benefactor
Feb
19
accepted Why does a faraday cage protect you from high currents?
Feb
15
comment Why does a faraday cage protect you from high currents?
Last but not least I don't understand why the skin effekt is cited sometimes in this context and how this relates to the other explanations. So would be great if you could add some details about those points.
Feb
15
comment Why does a faraday cage protect you from high currents?
So I understand your basic argument, that's clear. But I don't understand why this should not be the whole explanation. I also understand why the field in the static case is zero inside the cage. But I don't understand why this also applies when a current (for example in the case of lighting like in the picture in my question) is flowing. I also don't understand how this relates to the fact that the man in the cage is safe and how it ralates to your basic explanation.
Feb
15
comment Why does a faraday cage protect you from high currents?
So you support the basic point of view, I cited in my question: "Some people say that the fact that the man inside the cage is safe doesn't have to do anything with faradays cage, it's simply because the the cage is a better conductor." However the explanation I heared most often is an argument, which shows in the static case (without any currents), that the field inside the cage is zero. Then it is concluded (without discussing that now a current appears) that the man in the cage is in the demonstration like on the picture in my question is safe.
Feb
15
comment Why does a faraday cage protect you from high currents?
Here is a video where a person inside the cage is touching the inside (at minute 4:48): deutsches-museum.de/de/ausstellungen/energie/starkstromtechnik/…