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bio website topjaklont.org
location Toronto, Canada
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visits member for 3 years, 1 month
seen Dec 12 at 17:07

I'm a Post-Doctoral Fellow in atmospheric remote sensing at the University of Toronto in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. I first came to Stack Exchange for practical reasons: Tex.SE has been of major help when I wrote my licentiate (midterm) thesis. Since then, I have discovered the joy of many websites. As my network profile will show, I'm interested in travel, outdoor, scientific skepticism, and as I work in academia, also in academia and LaTeX.


Dec
12
comment Intensity in rainfall and global warming
You accuse me of disliking your interpretation for corrupt reasons, that I should return my PhD, and that the number of good scientists in my field can be counted on the fingers of two hands. I have indicated scientific arguments, a lot more can be found in the IPCC reports and the peer-reviewed papers those are based on. It is fine to have a different interpretation of the physics (such as Lindzen has), that is what a scientific debate means. It is not needed to make accusations. (So, Lindzen wrote a textbook. Anyone can. Does that make something "textbook material"?)
Dec
11
comment Intensity in rainfall and global warming
And I explained why I disagree with you. I would appreciate if we stick to the content and if you would not accuse me (and many other scientists) of corruption.
Dec
10
comment Intensity in rainfall and global warming
Climate science, such as compiled by the IPCC AR5 WG1 report, is based on many thousands of peer-reviewed publications, including Nature and Science, by established scientists with PhDs in physical sciences, including physics. The consensus is that there is strong evidence for antropogenic global warming. The models are (as all models) obviously incomplete, but the basic greenhouse effect physics is relatively simple. So unless you believe there is a giant conspiracy going on, you should write down why it's all wrong and publish it in a reputable journal. If it passes peer review, that is.
Dec
10
comment Intensity in rainfall and global warming
The probability distribution of precipitation events is strongly non-linear. It certainly does have a tail. The system overall is highly non-linear and a small shift in climate certainly can have large consequences for extreme precipitation events.
Dec
9
comment Intensity in rainfall and global warming
Models do not agree to what degree precipitation patterns will change. It is complicated by possibly changing dynamics in both the oceans and the atmosphere. I don't know how you reached the 1° or 2° per century figure. Even a small shift in the centre of a normal distribution can make events in the tail (i.e. severe storms) a lot more common. I don't claim to know exactly what will happen; my claim is that the dynamics of the atmosphere under (anthropogenic) global warming is not a simple problem at all. Many thousands of good scientists work on it. And they do not need to return their PhDs.
Dec
9
comment Intensity in rainfall and global warming
Sure, the gradient, dT/dy as such, does not increase. But a hotter surface, higher troposphere, larger temperature difference between surface and tropopause, is involved with deeper and more intense convective systems thus higher rainfall intensities. Which one can describe as "more energy in the system". As for the 2nd law of thermodynamics, entropy increases in a closed system. The Earth is not a closed system.
Dec
5
comment Intensity in rainfall and global warming
This question would be welcome at Earth Science.
Dec
5
comment Intensity in rainfall and global warming
There will always be a gradient between temperatures at the surface and the upper troposphere. The difference between surface and upper tropospheric temperatures increases if surface temperatures increase. Therefore, said gradients increase. More intense surface heating means more intense convection means more intense (tropical) storms. Your accusations of pretty much the entire field of atmospheric science is unscientific and unconvincing.
Dec
4
comment How is wind created?
See also Earth Science Stack Exchange.
Nov
25
comment Can a car steer on a frictionless surface?
You could with rocket propulsion.
Nov
23
awarded  Yearling
Nov
4
comment Is the atmospheric pressure the cause of a planet's surface temperature or is it the temperature the cause of a planet's atmospheric pressure?
See also Earth Science Stack Exchange.
Oct
28
comment Why would the lack of air in a mine in an asteroid prevent you from flooding it?
@DavidRicherby But not in an ambient vacuum.
Oct
1
comment Why did nuclear testing not result in nuclear winter?
You've got your spheres wrong. Anything in the troposphere gets rained out quickly and problems arise when aerosols get past the troposphere reaching the stratosphere. The stratopause, separating the stratosphere from the mesosphere, is not relevant in this context.
Oct
1
comment What is a 'moist greenhouse effect'?
Funny how the moist "greenhouse effect" involves the loss of our strongest greenhouse gas.
Oct
1
comment What is a 'moist greenhouse effect'?
(See also Earth Science Stack Exchange)
Oct
1
suggested rejected edit on climate-science tag wiki excerpt
Sep
26
revised geophysics wiki excerpt
See also Earth Science SE.
Sep
26
revised earth wiki excerpt
See also [EarthScience.SE].
Sep
26
suggested approved edit on geophysics tag wiki excerpt