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Jan
24
answered Why is cold fusion considered bogus?
Jan
24
asked What is the name of the principle saying it is meaningless to talk/ask questions that can not be measured/tested?
Jan
24
comment Is rotational motion relative to space?
@Sklivvz : Thank you, It is an interesting difference that I did not realize. Now should I delete this post, leave it as it is or do something else? Also are there any points/lists like the point you mentioned to help newbies to how this forum works? or I'll learn it by trial and error like what happened with this post?
Jan
24
comment Is rotational motion relative to space?
@Sklivvz : Why was my answer was meant to be a comment rather than an answer?
Jan
20
awarded  Teacher
Jan
19
awarded  Scholar
Jan
19
comment Non Classical mechanic answer to : length of time a thrown object spends in rest before falling down?
Thank you. will try
Jan
19
comment Non Classical mechanic answer to : length of time a thrown object spends in rest before falling down?
How should I ask this question to find out how long before a moving object/particle reverses it's direction?
Jan
19
revised Non Classical mechanic answer to : length of time a thrown object spends in rest before falling down?
added 146 characters in body; deleted 4 characters in body; edited title
Jan
19
comment Non Classical mechanic answer to : length of time a thrown object spends in rest before falling down?
That is a very interesting result, but coming to rest is different than being at equilibrium (?)( I think )
Jan
19
comment Non Classical mechanic answer to : length of time a thrown object spends in rest before falling down?
Since classical physics is superseded, in what framework is there an answer other than 0 time? 0 time just seemed wrong!
Jan
19
answered Misused physics analogies
Jan
19
asked Non Classical mechanic answer to : length of time a thrown object spends in rest before falling down?
Jan
18
awarded  Commentator
Nov
29
comment Is rotational motion relative to space?
@Marek, All theoretical physics has been proved by experiment, maybe somethings are predicted but they still need to be verified in reality. Theoretical physics tries to come up with theories that have fit the physical reality. The thought experiments were only used to come up with an idea to be verified. If the SR and GR could have not be experimentally tested what would they be? What is the point of an untestable theory. If somebody said that if universe was made up of only one unicorn and SR and GR will still be valid, that is not theory it is just nonsense.
Nov
28
comment Is rotational motion relative to space?
@Marek, I was not saying anything about Theoretical Physics, But without experiments and independent tests that something can be proved or disproved is it science? Why nobody wants to answer the simple question that what makes them think that two universes that are so different will behave the same way? Even in cosmology the experts quantify that what they are talking about is within the boundaries of the observed universe and not the absolute truth. Where is the theoretical physics principle that says the amount of mass in universe does not change the observed physical laws? Have a nice day
Nov
28
comment Is rotational motion relative to space?
@Marek the "accepted" answer is neither logical nor scientific. Where is the experiment of the Earth only universe will be the same? There is no experiment, there is just an idealistic extension if the rules to compare two universes that differ by at least $10^{28}$ order of magnitude in mass. How can one know for sure that the mass where black holes form will also not be different? A "physics" answer requires experiment, so the answer given was not a physics answer. Since Einstein philosophy is part of Physics. Experiments make Physics a science. Without experiment there is no science
Nov
28
comment Is rotational motion relative to space?
@Sklivvz, Marek's answer is about what I am trying to get at. What I don't understand is that reducing the universe of more than $10^{54}$ kilogram mass (that is las than $5%$ of the mass of the obsorvable universe)to a universe of only $10^{24} kg mass and expecting it to be the same? How could the answer be answered within science if the experiment can not be conducted? Just because one can not imagine the laws of physics would not stay the same without experiment how could it be said that it would? This is not a thought experiments like GR, GR has not been verified in a Earth only universe.
Nov
28
comment Is rotational motion relative to space?
What does GR has to do with this question? Extending all the observed laws of this universe to one with only Earth in it without showing that the causes of the laws will still be preserved in a universe comprised of only $10^{-28}$ * mass of this universe is not sound. What if a universe just like the one we observe was only $\displaystyle 10^{-80}$ cubic meters in size, would all the rotational effects still be there?
Nov
28
comment Is rotational motion relative to space?
In a universe where Earth is the only object, i.e. Earth is the universe. What is gravity? (If gravity is a force that acts between at least 2 entities.) The observations of this universe can not be extended to a universe witch is made up only with Earth. The effects that have been observed are from a universe where Earth is not the only Entity. Now the causes of the of the effects are unknown (although the effects are known). Now my point is this: If everything besides Earth is excluded in the new universe, what would guarantee that the causes of rotational effects will still to be present?