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visits member for 3 years, 8 months
seen Mar 13 at 20:19

Feb
7
asked Significance of the second focus in elliptical orbits
Feb
1
comment Why is cold fusion considered bogus?
@Steven Devijver : Is that all they are doing? Repeating the same experiment over and over? That is madness! I thought by research they meant varying, modifying, realizing new things. Of course repeating the same experiment and expecting a different result is insane, but that shouldn't be called research.
Jan
31
revised Why is cold fusion considered bogus?
added 314 characters in body
Jan
27
comment Why is cold fusion considered bogus?
I guess so at some point a line must be drawn. But the question is who should draw the line, us that are not funding them, or scientific community that has become the new dogma. Looking at how much money has been wasted on wars, the total research funding (both scientific and crank like) is nothing. If somebody decides to follow up on perpetual motion machines, I would point them to what is known and history of attempts and wish them all the best. A perpetual motion machine that uses zero point energy be a new twist? en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zero-point_energy#Claims_in_pseudoscience
Jan
26
comment Why is cold fusion considered bogus?
@gigacyan : By what is known today, yes it is impossible. But in trying there would be new things learned and progress made. Maybe not in the cold fusion itself but other areas. In mathematics solving the hard problems on their own did not matter much at the end, but in the way to do that many more tools/discoveries were made. For example look at the the Fermat's Last Theorem, whether it was true or not was not as important as the fields of study that were invented by the people were working on it. It is not just about the final result but the journey to get there.
Jan
25
comment Why is cold fusion considered bogus?
@gigacyan : Dear gigacyan, In Sydney there is maritime building, every time I pass by the entrance of the building I see a huge knot woven together by steel strands. In the sign next to it, it is mentioned that the person who did it, did it with the knowledge of engineers having clearly known for a fact that knot is impossible. Yet there it stands, despite the belief of many experts in the field, it has been done. Science is not rule of the mobs, the victory belongs to those who do not accept what can NOT be done, but try to figure out how to do it.
Jan
25
awarded  Student
Jan
24
accepted What is the name of the principle saying it is meaningless to talk/ask questions that can not be measured/tested?
Jan
24
answered Why is cold fusion considered bogus?
Jan
24
asked What is the name of the principle saying it is meaningless to talk/ask questions that can not be measured/tested?
Jan
24
comment Is rotational motion relative to space?
@Sklivvz : Thank you, It is an interesting difference that I did not realize. Now should I delete this post, leave it as it is or do something else? Also are there any points/lists like the point you mentioned to help newbies to how this forum works? or I'll learn it by trial and error like what happened with this post?
Jan
24
comment Is rotational motion relative to space?
@Sklivvz : Why was my answer was meant to be a comment rather than an answer?
Jan
20
awarded  Teacher
Jan
19
awarded  Scholar
Jan
19
comment Non Classical mechanic answer to : length of time a thrown object spends in rest before falling down?
Thank you. will try
Jan
19
accepted Non Classical mechanic answer to : length of time a thrown object spends in rest before falling down?
Jan
19
comment Non Classical mechanic answer to : length of time a thrown object spends in rest before falling down?
How should I ask this question to find out how long before a moving object/particle reverses it's direction?
Jan
19
revised Non Classical mechanic answer to : length of time a thrown object spends in rest before falling down?
added 146 characters in body; deleted 4 characters in body; edited title
Jan
19
comment Non Classical mechanic answer to : length of time a thrown object spends in rest before falling down?
That is a very interesting result, but coming to rest is different than being at equilibrium (?)( I think )
Jan
19
comment Non Classical mechanic answer to : length of time a thrown object spends in rest before falling down?
Since classical physics is superseded, in what framework is there an answer other than 0 time? 0 time just seemed wrong!