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Apr
11
comment Why does Principle for least action hold for classical fields
@Qmechanic The question I'm asking here is very different from those two questions. I'm not asking why motion of a particle follows the principle of least action, which comes from the Newton's laws. My question is for classical field theory like EM and gravitational field. One obvious answer is Newton's gravity law and Maxwell eqns imply the the principle of least action. But the fact that both of these field theories satisfy the least action principle, does that mean there is something deeper going around? Is it the particular of these laws which frorce them to satisfy the least action.
Apr
10
revised Why does Principle for least action hold for classical fields
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Apr
10
revised Why does Principle for least action hold for classical fields
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Apr
10
revised Why does Principle for least action hold for classical fields
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Apr
10
asked Why does Principle for least action hold for classical fields
Mar
20
asked A roadmap for learning standard model of particle physics
Dec
31
answered Best calculus book for physics
Nov
9
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Oct
18
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Aug
27
revised Does every hermitian operator represent a measurable quantity?
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Aug
27
comment Does every hermitian operator represent a measurable quantity?
What is the precise definition of the term observable? How do you know a hermitian operator is observable or not?
Aug
27
asked Does every hermitian operator represent a measurable quantity?
Aug
6
asked Church-Turing hypothesis as a fundamental law of physics
May
24
revised Planet in which satellite(moon) and star(sun) appear together once a year
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May
24
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Apr
14
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Apr
4
revised Does the observer or the camera collapse the wave function in the double slit experiment?
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Apr
4
comment Does the observer or the camera collapse the wave function in the double slit experiment?
I think your question is what isdefinition of measurement in quantum mechanics or equivalently when does a "wavefunction" collapse happen? For this you can read this article en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Measurement_in_quantum_mechanics Though I don't think there is any universally accepted definition of measurment in QM.See my edited amswer.
Apr
4
answered Does the observer or the camera collapse the wave function in the double slit experiment?