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  • 29 votes cast
Jan
8
comment Polarization in high energy vacuum non-linearity?
Okay, is the material that these pairs generate first order (linear) or are they non-linear in terms of expansion of the polarization? Can we just write a small linear suspectability into the Helmholtz equation and be done with it?
Jan
6
comment Polarization in high energy vacuum non-linearity?
@igael For example on Wikipedia: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nonlinear_optics or cft.edu.pl/~birula/publ/NonlStrct.pdf
Dec
14
comment Is this wave spatially coherent?
The 'field' is intrinsically random and you drew one possible realization. Notice that the squiggles you drew could be due to a 100% coherent source that scattered off some kind of grid. As you noted, its hard to understand the coherence of a bunch of squiggles (because thats not conceptually correct).
Dec
14
comment point particle explanation of refraction
@BenitoCiaro Its not purely mathematical, it summarizes the behavior of particle in a material. Sometimes the material is difficult to understand (like the luminiferous ether) but its not any less real then the following gif: jjvernon.com/tpb1/Resources/peoplewave.gif In a typical graduate physics class you would go from the equation of motion of an electron to the polarization and the resulting fields. The "action at a distance element is not important. Indeed, classical theories don't appear to act at a distance.
Dec
14
comment If a silver atom scatters light isotropically, what happens if only a single photon is scattered?
The lazy way is to assume the field is classical, and use the Raleigh approximation to get the differential cross section. A normalized version of the differential cross section will give you the probability of finding the photon at that particular point.
Dec
13
comment point particle explanation of refraction
@BenitoCiaro Your comment sounds a little anti-intellectual. These fields are perfectly measurable, so calling them "construct without any known physical analog" is incorrect. Indeed, DLS methods are used in industry to characterize the content of aqueous solutions. Scattering from particles in like electrons was first measured, then explained.
Nov
27
comment Elastic collision between two circles
You need to clarify what isn't working, for example solving for the analytic solution is easier than implementing the solution in a video game with time-stepping.
Nov
26
comment Is there a time operator in quantum mechanics?
I really like your response, can you clarify where QM only "picks half the variables". Is this due to the representation as a complex analytic signal or that we project onto a <ket| that measures position and not position+momentum when getting a "measurable" quantity?
May
8
comment Microscopic fields inside a conductor
The field at a particle is singular...
Mar
21
comment Entanglement, real or just math?
A loophole free violation of a Bell's inequality remains a daunting task as discussed here: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Loopholes_in_Bell_test_experiments
Nov
11
comment Is the time reversed laser really a laser?
Thank you for the detailed answer, I think the comment about the positron really hit the nail on the head.
Sep
29
comment Simple explanation of Quantum Zeno Effect
I believe Faraday rotation is more properly termed the "Anti-Quantum Zeno Effect"
May
5
comment Resolution Limit for Energy Transition Imaging
@DumpsterDoofus Thank you for your comment. I'm still confused on the point of why the electron density is important. Unlike transmission imaging techniques, my understanding is that in florescence, ideally we only want to see the fluorophore protein and thus the specimen can only mess up our measurement. Thats why i'm not sure what to do with the notion of a living cell's electron density. For example, without optics I can't see better then the Ewald sphere because the most a photon can be scattered is 180 degrees.
Mar
13
comment Should a 1D Guassian wave oscillate?
@Kitchi, I am confident there are no errors in the code. I want to know if a pulse like solution should have oscillations as it travels. If I didn't make this clear please rephrase my question.
Feb
27
comment Yield Strength versus Ultimate Strength
@deadly appliedmechanics.asmedigitalcollection.asme.org/… Thornton CC. Coefficient of Restitution for Collinear Collisions of Elastic-Perfectly Plastic Spheres. J. Appl. Mech.. 1997;64(2):383-386. doi:10.1115/1.2787319.
Feb
22
comment Industry application of computational quantum mechanics?
Sounds like there aren't many.
Dec
15
comment Why is the transition into N proportional to N+1?
@LuboŇ°Motl Thanks for the comment, the quote is actually from a paper, I wonder if you could expand your comment into answer so that I can give you the award...
Dec
15
comment The Role of Gravity among the Fundamental Forces of Nature
Can you recommend some literature on new-age metaphysics :-)
Nov
30
comment Why does the universe exhibit three large-scale spatial dimensions?
I wonder if its possible to answer this question, as it asks for not merely the law but a reason for the law. Asking why gravity one should terminate at a phrase like because we observed... Likewise the 3+1 dimension theory exists because quantum experiments were observed - in the same manner as it is increasingly apparent more dimensions might not exist due recent LHC runs.
Nov
24
comment Can high charges (like $1\times 10^{-3}$ coulomb) be acheived?
@MichaelLuciuk does charge stored in a capacitor bank qualify? The largest capacitor is 50 MeJ at 24kV, which means about ~1K Coulombs depending on AC/DC, you may be surprised to learn the trade-off associated with capacitance...