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  • 29 votes cast
Mar
18
revised Optics of the eye - do we see Fourier transforms?
added 232 characters in body
Jan
8
comment Polarization in high energy vacuum non-linearity?
Okay, is the material that these pairs generate first order (linear) or are they non-linear in terms of expansion of the polarization? Can we just write a small linear suspectability into the Helmholtz equation and be done with it?
Jan
6
comment Polarization in high energy vacuum non-linearity?
@igael For example on Wikipedia: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nonlinear_optics or cft.edu.pl/~birula/publ/NonlStrct.pdf
Jan
6
asked Polarization in high energy vacuum non-linearity?
Dec
14
comment Is this wave spatially coherent?
The 'field' is intrinsically random and you drew one possible realization. Notice that the squiggles you drew could be due to a 100% coherent source that scattered off some kind of grid. As you noted, its hard to understand the coherence of a bunch of squiggles (because thats not conceptually correct).
Dec
14
answered Is this wave spatially coherent?
Dec
14
comment point particle explanation of refraction
@BenitoCiaro Its not purely mathematical, it summarizes the behavior of particle in a material. Sometimes the material is difficult to understand (like the luminiferous ether) but its not any less real then the following gif: jjvernon.com/tpb1/Resources/peoplewave.gif In a typical graduate physics class you would go from the equation of motion of an electron to the polarization and the resulting fields. The "action at a distance element is not important. Indeed, classical theories don't appear to act at a distance.
Dec
14
awarded  Talkative
Dec
14
comment If a silver atom scatters light isotropically, what happens if only a single photon is scattered?
The lazy way is to assume the field is classical, and use the Raleigh approximation to get the differential cross section. A normalized version of the differential cross section will give you the probability of finding the photon at that particular point.
Dec
14
answered If a silver atom scatters light isotropically, what happens if only a single photon is scattered?
Dec
13
comment point particle explanation of refraction
@BenitoCiaro Your comment sounds a little anti-intellectual. These fields are perfectly measurable, so calling them "construct without any known physical analog" is incorrect. Indeed, DLS methods are used in industry to characterize the content of aqueous solutions. Scattering from particles in like electrons was first measured, then explained.
Dec
13
revised point particle explanation of refraction
added 110 characters in body
Dec
13
revised point particle explanation of refraction
added 207 characters in body
Dec
13
answered point particle explanation of refraction
Nov
27
comment Elastic collision between two circles
You need to clarify what isn't working, for example solving for the analytic solution is easier than implementing the solution in a video game with time-stepping.
Nov
26
comment Is there a time operator in quantum mechanics?
I really like your response, can you clarify where QM only "picks half the variables". Is this due to the representation as a complex analytic signal or that we project onto a <ket| that measures position and not position+momentum when getting a "measurable" quantity?
Nov
26
answered Is there a way to make a heat pipe that can transfer heat downward?
May
15
awarded  Tumbleweed
May
8
asked Inhomogeneous scattering from a dielectric box in 2D?
May
8
comment Microscopic fields inside a conductor
The field at a particle is singular...