277 reputation
113
bio website bitmask.de
location Germany
age
visits member for 3 years, 1 month
seen May 8 at 6:51

Hey, I am a computer scientist and enthusiast programmer, who sometimes worries too much about architecture/design.

Accept policy

If you wonder why I didn't accept your answer, although it is obviously the right thing: Usually, I like to wait at least an hour before accepting anything, often I wait a day or so.

More random information about me

kernel: linux
distro: debian
interface: xmonad+gnome
text: vim
web: opera
mail: icedove (aka thunderbird)
programming: c++, bash
speak: de, en, es (rusty), fr (very! limited)
rcs: git
scifi: The Matrix, Star Trek, Doctor Who, Firefly

First to earn the the-matrix bronze badge on scifi.SE.

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Bad Wolf


Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Jul
31
awarded  Popular Question
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jun
18
awarded  Popular Question
May
8
awarded  Popular Question
Aug
13
awarded  Nice Question
May
5
accepted How do I determine the location of a free particle with Schrödinger's equation?
May
3
accepted Connection between a simple matter wave and Heisenberg's uncertainty relation
May
3
comment Connection between a simple matter wave and Heisenberg's uncertainty relation
Awesome answer. Thank you so very much!
May
2
asked Connection between a simple matter wave and Heisenberg's uncertainty relation
May
1
comment How do I determine the location of a free particle with Schrödinger's equation?
Thanks! I had to read this a couple of times but I think I got the gist of it. It seems I failed horribly when choosing a simple example to understand the wave function :)
May
1
comment How do I determine the location of a free particle with Schrödinger's equation?
It seems to me that you have explained as well as humanly possible and the issue is now a bit clearer to me, thanks. But it now kills the parts that I thought I had already understood ... back to the books, then :)
May
1
comment How do I determine the location of a free particle with Schrödinger's equation?
The first half of this answer actually makes sense to me but the second I don't quite get (and the downvote confuses me). Anyhow, to get a non-silly answer, I would have to plug in some constraints first and get a value for A or how would I go about doing that?
May
1
comment How do I determine the location of a free particle with Schrödinger's equation?
Well, the example is discussed in a (very good) textbook and a lecture (they just don't go into detail regarding the particle's position). So it must have some meaning. A free particle with a constant velocity doesn't strike me as an "unphysical" situation. I admit that I might have done some errors in my calculation, but the premise should be valid.
May
1
comment How do I determine the location of a free particle with Schrödinger's equation?
@Vibert: If I trap the particle, this merely changes the normalisation and gives me a finite value for A. But the core derivation doesn't seem to change.
May
1
asked How do I determine the location of a free particle with Schrödinger's equation?
Jan
10
comment Why is the tunnel effect of solid matter not observable in macroscopic objects?
I was thinking about gradual tunnelling. I'm specifically not asking about whether or not the cup could tunnel through the table at the same time which seems to be the core of your answer.
Jan
10
comment Why is the tunnel effect of solid matter not observable in macroscopic objects?
Please re-read the question carefully.
Dec
3
awarded  Caucus
Nov
18
awarded  Yearling