3,631 reputation
1117
bio website about.sjrdesign.net
location Boulder, CO
age 31
visits member for 2 years, 11 months
seen Jul 29 at 3:44

Professional geophysicst/astronomer who also writes the blog, "Exposing PseudoAstronomy," and runs the podcast by that name.


Sep
19
answered Why can't Jupiter be seen over Thanksgiving break?
Sep
16
comment Phases of the moon video
Are you sure it's phases of the moon? I've seen one like that that is about the seasons, where they're asking Harvard graduates on graduation day and like 1 in 10 know why we have seasons.
Sep
15
comment What is the name of this galaxy in HCG7?
Ah, I was misoriented because the HST shot doesn't present a wide field. I've corrected my post after looking more into it and looking in Starry Night.
Sep
15
answered What is the name of this galaxy in HCG7?
Sep
2
answered Rainbow around Sun
Sep
1
answered Collision of Phobos
Aug
3
comment Is there any evidence for the claim that the moon was once part of the Earth?
@dagorym: I run a blog called "Exposing PseudoAstronomy," so potential misinterpretations and an eye on falsified ideas that some people still cling to are always in my mind.
Aug
3
answered How did micrometeorite flux change with the age of the solar system?
Aug
3
comment How did micrometeorite flux change with the age of the solar system?
Note: Your subject line is different from your question.
Aug
1
comment Is there any evidence for the claim that the moon was once part of the Earth?
Might be beating a dead post, but I feel I should point out that this is in answer to "parts of the moon came from a primordial Earth," NOT that "the moon split from Earth." These are VERY different things, the first (and what the answer is) being the "Big Splash" hypothesis where a Mars-sized object struck Earth and formed the moon, versus the fission hypothesis where Earth was spinning really fast and spawned the moon (or the latest "Big Burp" where an early explosion within Earth blasted material out to form the moon).
Jul
31
comment When will Enceladus run out of water?
An important point to make here is that we also have no idea (a) how long this has been going on, (b) how long it will continue, and (c) if the rates have been steady. So, any estimate at the moment is going to be based on a steady-state which is unlikely to be accurate.
Jul
30
answered The orbit of 2010 TK7
Jul
30
comment How is the shape of the universe measured by scientists?
I highly recommend reading the book "Sphereland" by Dionys Burger. It is a "sequel" to the much older book "Flatland" by Edwin Abbott that discusses this issue from the standpoint of going down a dimension -- so if we lived in 2D, how would we measure curvature of our 2D universe in higher dimensions when we can't experience them.
Jul
29
comment Next crescent moon?
Out of curiosity, how does the calendar define the "first appearance of crescent moon"? Practically speaking, I have trouble finding the moon until it's around 3-4%, but I know some who can find it at 1%.
Jul
29
comment Next crescent moon?
Good point, Andrew. Though scientifically speaking, unless you are at the exact moment of deepest totality during a solar eclipse, the moon can never be fully new, there will always be the slightest bit of a crescent. Checking Starry Night Pro, it looks like tomorrow at about 12:40PM MDT (I think we're -7 GMT, so 7:40PM GMT) is the moment of the New Moon.
Jul
29
answered Next crescent moon?
Jul
28
comment The orbit of 2010 TK7
The Bad Astronomer has a good article on this that I think will explain the oscillation to your satisfaction. Check out blogs.discovermagazine.com/badastronomy/2011/07/27/… . I also couldn't find a term "visous" in the BBC article - I was going to suggest you meant "viscous."
Jul
25
answered Which citizen-science astrophysics and astronomy projects currently exist?
Jul
23
comment Maximum depth for bacteria on rogue planets
Please clarify. "Reach" by what mechanism? And survive?
Jul
23
answered Vesta dwarf planet status