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age 27
visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen Aug 22 at 17:02

PhD candidate at the Institute for Quantum Computing, University of Waterloo.


Aug
29
awarded  Nice Question
Mar
8
comment Source term of the Einstein field equation
Thanks! I consider the following quote to be an excellent answer to my question: "Given a small ball of freely falling test particles initially at rest with respect to each other, the rate at which it begins to shrink is proportional to its volume times: the energy density at the center of the ball, plus the pressure in the direction at that point, plus the pressure in the direction, plus the pressure in the direction." Baez claims that this statement is equivalent to the usual formulation of Einstein's equation.
Oct
26
awarded  Yearling
May
4
awarded  Scholar
May
4
awarded  Nice Question
Feb
11
comment Introduction to neutron star physics
I'm OK with that :D
Feb
5
accepted Introduction to neutron star physics
Feb
5
comment Introduction to neutron star physics
Looks good! Thanks, Piotr.
Feb
5
comment Interesting topics to research in mathematical physics for undergraduates
I'm sure it's just a co-incidence... ;-)
Feb
2
answered Interesting topics to research in mathematical physics for undergraduates
Feb
2
comment Interesting topics to research in mathematical physics for undergraduates
I think it's better to have a problem in mind rather than the techniques you want to use to solve it. You might not know which techniques should be used ahead of time!
Feb
2
asked Introduction to neutron star physics
Jan
30
accepted Source term of the Einstein field equation
Jan
30
comment Source term of the Einstein field equation
So I guess my concern came down to whether the active mass of an ideal gas in a container of fixed size varied in the temperature or the pressure... but they are equal up to a constant in this case. I accept the answer now.
Jan
30
comment Source term of the Einstein field equation
Lubos, I didn't have a previously existing opinion, so I'm not sure what I repeated.
Jan
22
comment Source term of the Einstein field equation
I'm pondering this answer... my concern is that Penrose might have been referring to the pressure required to keep all the energy enclosed within the sphere, and the reason I am concerned is because Feynman may have intended for the active mass to inclue kinetic energy terms.
Jan
21
asked Source term of the Einstein field equation
Nov
9
awarded  Supporter
Nov
9
answered Can there be black light? I mean is it possible to devise a machine that outputs darkness?
Nov
9
awarded  Student