Reputation
553
Next privilege 1,000 Rep.
Create new tags
Badges
3 13 33
Impact
~95k people reached

  • 0 posts edited
  • 2 helpful flags
  • 27 votes cast
Apr
18
accepted 2d or 1d conduction in this scenario?
Apr
18
accepted How do I find the Gain of this Transfer Function
Apr
18
asked How would I go about solving this transient convection problem if the mean fluid temperature is constantly changing?
Apr
15
awarded  Yearling
Mar
27
comment How do I find the Gain of this Transfer Function
Is there a way to find the phase of this transfer function as well?
Mar
27
comment How do I find the Gain of this Transfer Function
That makes sense because I just read something where if the numerator is unity, like it is, then you just some the squares of the real and imaginary parts of the denominator and square root them. I think it would work
Mar
27
asked How do I find the Gain of this Transfer Function
Mar
8
revised 2d or 1d conduction in this scenario?
deleted 33 characters in body
Mar
8
asked 2d or 1d conduction in this scenario?
Mar
3
accepted How to find the value of the parameter $a$ in this transfer function?
Mar
1
comment How to find the value of the parameter $a$ in this transfer function?
I am taking a Systems, Dynamics, and Controls course at the undergraduate level right now. I hope you are good at this stuff so I got the right answer!
Mar
1
asked How to find the value of the parameter a in this transfer function?
Mar
1
comment How to find the value of the parameter $a$ in this transfer function?
Well i gave the question and then gave my solution and asked if it was right. Maybe it didn't look like a question to the common reader. Oops. Do you have any knowledge about this question though?
Mar
1
comment How to find the value of the parameter $a$ in this transfer function?
Yes it's a homework question. I am given a transfer function and then asked to find the value of $a$ that would make $\zeta=.7$
Mar
1
comment How to find the value of the parameter $a$ in this transfer function?
It wouldn't be 2.86 because $\omega_{n}=\sqrt{a}$. I got $a=8.163$. But thank you for letting me know that I did it right. I didnt think that I could equate it like that
Mar
1
asked How to find the value of the parameter $a$ in this transfer function?
Feb
27
comment In what situations do I use the characteristic length of a fin to find the surface area?
So just answer these few questions with yes or no answers (if possible): 1. Was it fine that I used the equation $R_{f}=\frac{1}{hA_{f}\eta{f}}$ with the corrected area even though you just said that you would permanently get rid of it you were a teacher. 2. Was it wrong of my professor to not be consistent with his formulas? I.e. He used the corrected length for the efficiency but not for the area.
Feb
26
comment In what situations do I use the characteristic length of a fin to find the surface area?
Ok nevermind. I was thinking of some other equation by accident. So in the case with the exam I took, I was asked to find the efficiency and resistance of a fin. I used the equation $$R_{f}=\frac{1}{hA_{f}\eta_{f}}$$ but I used the efficiency and area equation using the corrected length and the professor used the efficiency equation with the corrected length and the area equation with the regular length. Who would be right in this case? Would I be able to argue for full credit?
Feb
26
comment In what situations do I use the characteristic length of a fin to find the surface area?
He didnt use that rigorous one. I looked at the solution and he used $$\eta_{f}=\frac{tanh(mL_{c})}{mL_{c}}$$ and $$A_{f}=2(w+t)L+wt$$ Essentially, he is using the corrected length for one equation but not for the other which, like you said, is inconsistent. But what if he used the area equation without the corrected length but use the other equation for the efficiency by using the temperature distribution. Would that theoretically yield the same result or would it be different? Pretty much does it matter which method you use as long as you stay consistent with which 'type' of length you use?
Feb
26
asked At what point can we assume the tip of a fin is adiabatic?