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Mechanical Engineering Student at Georgia Tech

EMail:Gharrington44@gmail.com


Apr
4
accepted Help with change in specific volume with time in piston cylinder?
Apr
4
comment Help with change in specific volume with time in piston cylinder?
WOW. I cannot believe I overlooked that mistake the entire time. Thanks a lot for the help. I also did it the way you mentioned in the endnote and I found it much more convenient
Apr
4
comment Help with change in specific volume with time in piston cylinder?
I used the quotient rule and obtained $$\frac{d}{dm}(\frac{V(m)}{m})=\frac{m\frac{dV}{dm}-V(m)\frac{d}{dm}(\frac{1}{m}‌​)}{m^2}=\frac{m\frac{dV}{dm}+\frac{1}{m^2}V}{m^2}$$ The only way I could think of expanding $\frac{dV}{dm}$ is by making it $\frac{dV}{dt}\frac{dt}{dm}$ or $\frac{d}{dm}(mv)=v\frac{dm}{dm}+m\frac{dv}{dm}$ which just puts me back to where I began
Apr
4
comment Help with change in specific volume with time in piston cylinder?
when I used the quotient rule I reached $$\frac{dv}{dm}=\frac{d}{dm}(\frac{V(m)}{m})=\frac{1}{m}\frac{dV}{dm}+\frac{1}{m‌​^4}V(m)$$ and right away I realized I must have done something wrong because I have an $m^4$ when I should. Also, won't $\frac{dV}{dm}=\frac{d}{dm}(mv)$ just get me back to $\frac{dv}{dm}$ which was square one?
Apr
4
comment Help with change in specific volume with time in piston cylinder?
when I used the quotient rule I reached $$\frac{dv}{dm}=\frac{d}{dm}(\frac{V(m)}{m})=\frac{1}{m}\frac{dV}{dm}+\frac{1}{m‌​^4}V(m)$$ and right away I realized I must have done something wrong because I have an $m^4$ when I should. Also, won't $\frac{dV}{dm}=\frac{d}{dm}(mv)$ just get me back to $\frac{dv}{dm}$ which was square one?
Apr
4
asked Help with change in specific volume with time in piston cylinder?
Mar
31
comment Which temperature to evaluate fluid properties in pipe?
I figured I could use the inlet temperature to find the inlet density and viscosity which would allow me to find the mass flow rate which I know is constant. I would then use the average temperature between inlet and outlet to find the nusselt number. I could then account for property variation from temperature change using $$Nu = Nu_{m}(\frac{\mu_{m}}{\mu_{s}})^{n}$$ Does this sound like a reasonable approach? Or do you think I should evaluate the inlet density at the average of the inlet and the surface temp?
Mar
31
asked Which temperature to evaluate fluid properties in pipe?
Mar
16
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
16
awarded  Notable Question
Mar
11
comment Determine pipe outlet temperature without length?
@gregsan Are you sure there is no other way to find heat flux? This problem was on my professor's past exam and I am using it for practice. He must have made an error
Mar
11
asked Determine pipe outlet temperature without length?
Mar
3
comment Derivation of cylindrical line heat source problem?
Unfortunately I do have to do it this way. I agree that SoV and Bessel functions would be much easier
Mar
2
asked Derivation of cylindrical line heat source problem?
Mar
1
awarded  Popular Question
Feb
28
awarded  Popular Question
Feb
26
asked Can I apply symmetry to this boundary value problem (BVP)?
Feb
9
awarded  Popular Question
Feb
3
comment What does the absence of hydrodynamic entrance effects do to the momentum conservation Equation?
Even though the flow is still developing? I know there is velocity in the radial direction while the flow is still developing so I figured there would also be velocity in the theta direction
Feb
3
comment What does the absence of hydrodynamic entrance effects do to the momentum conservation Equation?
this is awesome. Thank you. I have one more question. Assuming an axi-symmetric pipe, is there a fluid velocity in the theta direction when the flow is still developing? My professor said in an email that there is no fluid velocity in the theta direction when the flow is still developing but I don't see why this is. If there is no velocity in the theta direction when it is developing or when it is fully developed then is there ever a fluid velocity in the theta direction?