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Sep
9
comment Problem book in Quantum mechanics with emphasis on physical(ly relevant) problems
Most physically relevant problems you encounter in current research would require some form of field theory. I'd suggest working through the first volume and then working through the second volume.
Sep
8
answered A Different Lasing Medium
Sep
3
comment Optical laser pumping and reflectors
Are you talking about a CW Laser or a Pulsed Laser?
Sep
1
comment Symbol for dashpot/damper (in a harmonic oscillator)
It depends on the whim of the author I suppose.
Sep
1
comment Symbol for dashpot/damper (in a harmonic oscillator)
You should look for the terms "driven" ,"damped" in the notes. This is what decides the behavior of your oscillator. No matter how the picture is, if your notes say "damped" you will have one form of the equation, if it says "driven" you will have the other form. Are you studying R-C oscillators?
Sep
1
answered Books that every physicist should read
Sep
1
comment Why does observation collapse the wave function?
The wave-particle debate should have been put to rest eons ago. As John Rennie said, field theory is how modern physics is done. It is unfortunately, in classes students are still being taught the Bohr Model etc under "Modern Physics". Go figure.
Sep
1
comment Symbol for dashpot/damper (in a harmonic oscillator)
By dashpot, do you mean the symbol below "C"? All you need to solve the problem is the differential equation, i.e the term proportional to the velocity. The picture is irrelevant.
Sep
1
answered Is emission/absorption of a photon lossy?
Aug
31
answered Why do some physicists believe that scalable quantum computing is possible?
Aug
31
comment When can a classical field theory be quantized?
Why is renormalizability the most important criterion to quantize a classical field? This may be a simple question, but I don't have a good understanding of field quantization.
Aug
30
comment How do I learn higher level physics?
Unfortunately, there is no escaping the mathematics necessary to understand field theory. I'd suggest starting out by organizing your study in terms of "mathematical tools" and "physical theories". You will need the latter for a deeper understanding of the former. My suggestion would be to start with Group Theory (Abstract Algebra) and go from there.
Aug
30
comment Why do some physicists believe that scalable quantum computing is possible?
May not be the most well formulated question, but certainly does not deserve a -1. Added a +1. @Craig Feinstein: Wiki is a bit outdated, but still useful. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quantum_computer
Aug
28
answered supressing certain decay paths and enhancing others with interference
Aug
3
comment Is the Higgs a quantum field or a particle?
Is it right to say that the Higgs field interacting with the Dirac field is what generates mass?
May
21
awarded  Revival
May
17
comment Can you split a photon?
Just to add to this comment, PDC is a non-resonant phenomenon with constraints being energy and momentum conservation. The non-resonant aspect is experimentally critical because with resonant phenomena you have absorption that drastically reduces the efficiency of the conversion process.
May
8
answered Did anyone claim that quantum theory meant lasers would never work
May
8
comment What are the frameworks of physics?
Perfectly valid question. Removed the ridiculous -1 by adding a +1. Biological systems are very complicated and does not seem to fit into your framework. For example studying bulk properties of membranes by analyzing ionic currents seems to take more of an engineering/mathematical approach.
May
7
comment Particles for all forces: how do they know where to go, and what to avoid?
You can alleviate much of the confusion by a)discarding the classical notion of a particle being a point like object and more importantly b)thinking in terms of fields interacting with each other, i.e an electron field/proton field coupling with other fields. +1 for a good question.