155 reputation
5
bio website
location Denver, CO
age 40
visits member for 4 years
seen Oct 21 at 15:42

First used an Atari when I was 4 years old. At age 7 I learned to program in turtle Logo on a Commodore 64. When I was 11 I learned BASIC on the Apple II family. At 12 I carried that over to the IBM PC. At 18 I was trained to do Radio Repair in the Army, and at 20 I worked for AOL.

17 years later I have taught A+, Network+, held a JNCIA in routing, a JNCIS in Security, and currently hold Security+, CEH, CISSP, CCNA, CCNA Sec, and CCNP Sec certifications.

I'm also an avid amateur radio operator (WN7ANT). 73


Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Dec
29
asked A flammable gas in a energized conductive container
Jul
28
accepted Why are there photographs of nuclear tests?
Jul
28
comment Why are there photographs of nuclear tests?
If it matters, the tests I'm referring to were conducted by JTF-7. They were high yield (I believe high energy) studies.
Jul
28
asked Why are there photographs of nuclear tests?
Nov
22
awarded  Scholar
Nov
22
awarded  Supporter
Nov
22
accepted Big bang and time
Nov
22
comment Big bang and time
Now I know why I'm not a Physicist, I have to do it bassackwards ;)
Nov
22
comment Big bang and time
It was stated earlier "In physics, time is just a coordinate, like distance, height, or latitude or longitude" which I agree with, and THINK I understand. A coordinate goes with dimensionality. If you have 0 dimensions you only have 1 point. If everything was compressed (mass/energy and space/time), then the dimension of time was compressed with the space dimensions? If time dimensionality got compressed enough, would the beginning and end be touching? Sorry for the primitiveness of my understanding.
Nov
22
comment Big bang and time
I'm REALLY trying to stick with physics definitions, and avoid anything philosophical in my question.
Nov
22
comment Big bang and time
Can I compare the passage of time, at different points in time, instead of at the same time, at different points in space? And if I did that, would time flow faster or slower at 1 "moment" after the big bang as opposed to one "moment" now?
Nov
22
comment Big bang and time
What I'm trying to understand is this. If a black hole is so massive, that gravity can effect particles moving at the speed of light, and cause an effect on space time, how did time ever pass in the mass energy that was the big bang making there be a "next moment" where the big bang occurred? I'm only comparing this to black holes because it is something that has a lot of mass energy that currently exists in the known universe.
Nov
22
comment Big bang and time
I think I may have used the wrong term. Thank you for your patience with me, I really want to understand this. Let me go back to the sentence with the word dilation in it, and restate it. As mass increases a change occurs in the flow of time. That was what I meant to say. More to follow, saving edit...
Nov
22
awarded  Student
Nov
22
awarded  Editor
Nov
22
revised Big bang and time
added 746 characters in body; added 61 characters in body
Nov
21
asked Big bang and time