5,612 reputation
1732
bio website keith-s-thompson.github.com
location San Diego, CA
age 55
visits member for 3 years, 8 months
seen Jul 1 at 18:27

I'm a programmer and all-around nerd living in San Diego, California.
I work at JetHead Development Inc.

E-mail: Keith.S.Thompson@gmail.com


Jan
24
comment How physical objects (e.g. Earth and Apple) are aware and do computation about each other?
@MikeDunlavey: I'd say that both Newton's and Einstein's theories (as distinct from what they personally might have said about their theories) are observations about how things behave. Neither addresses the question of "why".
Jan
24
comment How physical objects (e.g. Earth and Apple) are aware and do computation about each other?
Nobody does. We observe how objects behave, and we refer to certain aspects of that behavior as "gravity". That doesn't mean we ultimately understand what, if anything, "causes" gravity. But I see no reason at all to assume that the underlying causes, if any, involve computation or awareness.
Jan
24
comment How physical objects (e.g. Earth and Apple) are aware and do computation about each other?
Why do you assume physical processes (which we may or may not entirely understand) require awareness and computation?
Jan
19
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
21
comment Didn't Newton's Corpuscular theory fail to explain reflection?
@VINAY: As I said, the idea is that the corpuscles interact with ordinary matter but not (significantly) with each other. For example, there might be one chance in a thousand of a corpuscle colliding with an atom of ordinary matter, but only one chance in a million of two corpuscles colliding. But we know that the corpuscular theory is wrong, so you can only go go so far in making it consistent with reality.
Dec
21
comment How to initiate fusion explosion without a fission trigger
Please tell me your interest is just theoretical! 8-)}
Dec
21
answered Gravitation law paradox for very close objects?
Dec
21
answered Didn't Newton's Corpuscular theory fail to explain reflection?
Dec
21
revised Didn't Newton's Corpuscular theory fail to explain reflection?
edited body
Oct
31
comment Is self gravitation theoretically impossible?
Wouldn't that imply perpetual motion? I doubt that even GR permits that, but I don't know enough to comment further.
Oct
12
awarded  Yearling
Oct
8
answered A question once confused Confucius
Oct
2
revised How does space affect the human body (no space suit, no space craft)
deleted 84 characters in body
Aug
13
revised Do the stars imaged by a telescope even exist at present?
added 110 characters in body
Aug
3
comment Opening the fridge door to cool a room
Opening the door will probably cool the room temporarily, as the cold air in the fridge flows into the room. But over time, the extra work done by the compressor will tend to heat the room.
Jul
26
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
29
comment Are there old aged particles?
Another way to think about the experimental evidence. Take two populations of 100 muons each. The first population consists of muons that were just created somehow. The second consists of muons that were created one second ago; as muons go they're old. (Given the 2.2 microsecond mean lifetime, this second population would be very difficult to produce.) Both populations should decay at the same rate; you can't tell the difference between them.
Apr
21
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
15
awarded  Necromancer
Apr
3
revised Is Feynman's explanation of how the moon stays in orbit wrong?
added 470 characters in body