5,642 reputation
1733
bio website keith-s-thompson.github.com
location San Diego, CA
age 55
visits member for 3 years, 9 months
seen Jul 15 at 23:59

I'm a programmer and all-around nerd living in San Diego, California.
I work at JetHead Development Inc.

E-mail: Keith.S.Thompson@gmail.com


Jul
16
comment Gravity on the International Space Station
@SlimShaggy: The figure of 4,250 miles might be with respect to the center of the Earth rather than the surface, though that's inconsistent with 100% at altitude 0.
Jul
16
comment How plausible is a subsurface ocean on Pluto?
Today's New Horizons results are being interpreted as evidence that some of the terrain on Pluto is only about 100 million years old, implying that it's still active, or has been recently. There's also been some talk of water ice. Both of these could have some bearing on this question, but I don't want to jump to conclusions. (Well, actually I do, but I'm resisting.)
Jul
10
awarded  Popular Question
Jun
14
revised Gravity on the International Space Station
added 126 characters in body
Jun
14
awarded  Good Answer
Mar
9
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
24
awarded  Good Answer
Dec
5
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
26
revised Andromeda/Milky Way collision: How, and how accurately, can a galaxy's lateral velocity be measured?
deleted 107 characters in body
Nov
26
accepted Andromeda/Milky Way collision: How, and how accurately, can a galaxy's lateral velocity be measured?
Nov
8
revised A mirror flips left and right, but not up and down
T2
Oct
12
awarded  Yearling
Sep
30
awarded  Explainer
Sep
23
awarded  Good Answer
Aug
25
comment How does gravity work underground?
The ancient Greeks knew about Newtonian gravity?
Jun
4
awarded  Necromancer
Jun
4
awarded  Nice Question
Apr
28
awarded  Enlightened
Apr
28
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
12
comment Why would a pendulum experiment give $g > 9.8\ \mathrm{m/s^2}$?
@Kvothe: Yes, but wouldn't applying the formula for larger angles (where the pendulum will take longer to swing back and forth than the simple formula implies) yields a smaller value for the gravitational acceleration -- assuming accurate measurements?