5,715 reputation
11034
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age 65
visits member for 3 years, 2 months
seen 9 hours ago

I have a PhD in physics, but for my career, I worked as a software engineer. In my retirement, I have gone back to my first love, Physics. I attend lots of physics colloquia, seminars, conferences and summer schools mostly in astrophysics, cosmology and particle physics.


Nov
14
revised How can anything ever fall into a black hole as seen from an outside observer?
Corrected a mistake - there is a LAST photon that will ever be detected by an outside observer.
Oct
27
accepted Is String Theory formulated in flat or curved spacetime?
Oct
6
awarded  Yearling
Sep
30
awarded  Explainer
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Aug
23
comment Why does space expansion not expand matter?
@babou - If there is no accelerated expansion, I don't think you can extract an unlimited amount of energy, but I might be wrong.
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jul
1
reviewed Approve Radioactive decay law and the exponential model, is it always valid?
Jun
28
awarded  Nice Question
Jun
25
reviewed Approve Are there massless bosons at scales above electroweak scale?
May
24
comment Are gravitational waves longitudinal or transverse?
@Flint72 - if you look at page 7 of the linked paper, you will see the orthogonal wave where the stretching and shrinking occurs at 45 degrees to the figure in the paper. See eftaylor.com/exploringblackholes/GravWaves100707V2.pdf
May
9
comment Size of universe after inflation?
@Flint72 .... Now in the rest frame of those CMB photons, the matter that emitted those photons will now be at a distance that is much more than 100 billion light years away from us at our current time. They will never be observed because of the accelerated expansion (if DE=0 they would eventually come back into our Hubble volume). So that is what I meant. Is this right?
May
9
comment Size of universe after inflation?
@Flint72 - I agree that the amount of matter in the observable universe will shrink as the accelerated expansion increases - which I think is what you mean. Is it? So at say, 100 billion years post big bang, there will still be CMB photons that will be redshifted down to a very long wavelength. Those photons traveled along our past light cone from a distance of 100 billion light years, right?
May
9
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
13
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
5
reviewed Reject Finding force vectors
Feb
4
awarded  Enlightened
Feb
4
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
8
revised What is the equation for the scale factor of the universe, a(t), for the best fit of data to the $\Lambda CDM$ Model of Cosmology?
LCDM is a better name than the Standard Model of Cosmology
Jan
8
revised What is the equation for the scale factor of the universe, a(t), for the best fit of data to the $\Lambda CDM$ Model of Cosmology?
edited title