182 reputation
7
bio website vedaproject.org
location San Antonio, TX
age 30
visits member for 3 years, 2 months
seen Dec 17 at 4:41

I am a Javascript and PHP programmer, starting an educational non-profit website:

http://www.vedaproject.org


Dec
16
comment If an airplane is flying sideways, is it in free fall?
Got it. I think you answered my question. Thanks!
Dec
16
comment If an airplane is flying sideways, is it in free fall?
...we do not have a source of lift. So I imagine we are falling. Is this rationale incorrect? If so, why?
Dec
16
comment If an airplane is flying sideways, is it in free fall?
@KyleKanos, So let's take wings and propellers separately. And I may easily be mistaken on any number of these points so feel free to correct me. Imagine we are flying with wings and suddenly the propellers fail. If the wings are at a 0 degree bank, then we would expect the horizontal velocity to allow the plane to glide for some period of time as the wings are still generating lift. Imagine we are flying again at 0 degrees with functioning propellers but the wings fall off. Then, we plummet to the ground even if we have propellers. But if we fly at 90 degrees, even if we have propellers...
Dec
16
comment If an airplane is flying sideways, is it in free fall?
Doesn't it only generate lift along the up down axis relative to the wings? That is, if the plane were flying with a 90 degree tilt laterally (let's say left wing pointed at the ground and the right at the sky), wouldn't pushing the stick forward and back only point the plane right and left respectively?
Dec
16
comment If an airplane is flying sideways, is it in free fall?
If the barrel roll can be done, it wouldn't necessarily rule out free fall at 90 degrees, since it will only be at 90 degrees for a moment. Thanks for the info on g forces. I hadn't even considered it. I'm curious though just conceptually whether the plane would be falling. For example, would a pilot-less aircraft flying sideways start falling towards the earth?
Dec
16
comment If an airplane is flying sideways, is it in free fall?
Thanks! Fixed it.
Oct
7
comment Can the universe be described by a Markov chain?
Why would non-linear phenomena be inherently non-Markov? Brownian motion isn't even differentiable at any point (and obviously isn't linear either), and it is Markov.
Oct
6
comment Can the universe be described by a Markov chain?
Excellent answer. I just have a quick question. Do we need quantum Markov chains instead of regular Markov chains because of the necessary uncertainty of the state that comes with Heisenberg's uncertainty principle?
Oct
5
comment Can the universe be described by a Markov chain?
You're absolutely right. My question was non-rigorously stated.
Oct
5
comment Can the universe be described by a Markov chain?
That's an excellent point. However, I was under the impression that a consequence of string theory (obviously it is just one among other hypotheses) was discrete space time--at least on a very small level. Even besides this, I was thinking that perhaps one could describe something like a continuous Markov chain as follows: x_t=f(x_{t-\delta}) and make that delta arbitrarily small to simulate continuity. Obviously, f(x_t) would have to be a continuous function itself for this to work.