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I'm a post-doctoral researcher with a wide range of interests. My career is in complex systems science (or maybe cybernetics) and the origins of life, but I also have research interests in

  • the foundations of statistical mechanics and its relationship to information theory
  • Earth systems science
  • non-equilibrium thermodynamics in general

I'm also generally interested in the foundations of quantum mechanics and in black holes, though I wouldn't say I'm an expert on those things.

It's probably worth noting that despite the fact that my research is in physics-related areas, all my degrees are in other subjects. If I occasionally seem to start talking in an alien language, this is probably why.


Jul
5
comment Chemical reaction as state transition?
What's a "suitable space", and in what way does Baez fail to write it down? I'm not saying he doesn't, just trying to understand what you're asking for.
Jul
5
comment Chemical reaction as state transition?
Just out of curiosity, where do those papers fall short in answering your question? (I'm not sure I understand the question fully.)
Jul
5
answered Chemical reaction as state transition?
Jul
5
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Do electrons have a radius when they behave like a particle?
Jul
5
reviewed Leave Open why is dark matter the best theory available to explain missing mass problems?
Jul
5
reviewed Close What is the phase difference of the oscillations of the two prongs of a tuning fork?
Jul
5
reviewed Close Why can the Euler beta function be interpreted as a scattering amplitude?
Jul
5
reviewed Close What is the alternative of PMG (Permanent Magnet Generator) in a Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine?
Jul
5
revised Are Lagrangians and Hamiltonians used by Engineers?
Dimension10's edit inexplicably removed the examples from the question, so I put them back.
Jul
5
comment In mechanics, is shock really better expressed as jerk instead of acceleration?
This is a very superficial answer that doesn't really address the question. Ben Crowell's answer is much better. Jerk can set things vibrating whereas constant acceleration cannot, so both jerk and acceleration can cause damage.
Jul
5
revised Variational Derivation of Schrodinger Equation
improved LaTeX
Jul
5
comment Can a magnet be tuned to attract only to one other magnet?
That's neat, I didn't know about those. Another way to do it is simply to surround the magnets with specially shaped baffles, so that only the desired magnets can fit together. I once used this technique to make "self-replicating" objects that float around on an air-hockey table - see mitpressjournals.org/doi/pdf/10.1162/artl_a_00056
Jul
4
reviewed No Action Needed In spontaneous symmetry breaking, global symmetry broken by gauged subgroup?
Jul
4
reviewed Close Current flows which way?
Jul
4
reviewed Leave Open Is String Theory proven to be finite?
Jul
4
reviewed Leave Open Could one “build” elements?
Jul
4
comment What part of the fan blade actually does the noise generation?
@MrLister that really isn't true, unless your fan has a particularly loud motor. Quiet motors aren't that hard to design, but designing quiet blades is a tricky problem indeed.
Jul
4
comment Is there an inherent difference between solids, liquids, and gases?
@annav what AlbeyAmakiir said. The phase transition between steam and water is a genuine phenomenon that can be observed in any laboratory or kitchen, but the fact that you can turn steam into water without a phase transition implies that they are not fundamentally distinct things. The line on the phase diagram represents an observable phenomenon, but it does not divide the phase space into two distinct regions because it stops at the critical point.
Jul
3
answered Is there a name for a quantity that represents (volumetric) flow per unit of mass?
Jul
3
comment Is there an inherent difference between solids, liquids, and gases?
Your explanation of why planets become round is quite wrong. A solid cube of cold steel the size of the Earth would become a sphere, not because it would melt but because steel is not strong enough to withstand the gravitational forces involved. It would deform continuously under the gravitational stress, satisfying the definition of a fluid.