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bio website nathanielvirgo.com
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I'm a post-doctoral researcher with a wide range of interests. My career is in complex systems science (or maybe cybernetics) and the origins of life, but I also have research interests in

  • the foundations of statistical mechanics and its relationship to information theory
  • Earth systems science
  • non-equilibrium thermodynamics in general

I'm also generally interested in the foundations of quantum mechanics and in black holes, though I wouldn't say I'm an expert on those things.

It's probably worth noting that despite the fact that my research is in physics-related areas, all my degrees are in other subjects. If I occasionally seem to start talking in an alien language, this is probably why.


3h
comment could the principle of sufficient reason adequately describe causation?
By the way I have no idea what your notation $E (E=MC2)MC2=E)E=E)$ means. Isn't there at least a missing parenthesis or two?
3h
comment could the principle of sufficient reason adequately describe causation?
This is an interesting technical question, but I can't help thinking you might have a better chance of finding people who can answer it at philosophy.stackexchange.com
1d
comment What is the age of the Universe from the big-bang light perspective?
Or if you prefer, the answer is zero, since proper time approaches zero as the observer's speed approaches $c$. Though, since those photons weren't emitted right at the big bang itself, you could also say the answer is 380,000 years, which is the age of the universe at the time of photon decoupling. (See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cosmic_microwave_background.)
1d
answered consequences of universe in which second law of thermodynamics does not hold
2d
comment Is this picture of the universe valid?
I don't think it's such a bad question if you read it carefully - it's a lot less non-mainstream than it sounds. I think the answer is "this is essentially the Everett interpretation of QM."
2d
comment Quantum entaglement and the arrow of time
I don't think you're missing anything. You're quite correct (IMHO) in saying Loschmidt's paradox has a perfectly good resolution in classical mechanics, but lots of people are still confused about it and continue to believe it needs a special explanation in terms of quantum mechanics.
Apr
17
answered Velocity required for orbit of satellite
Apr
14
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
13
comment Are the Hamiltonian and Lagrangian always convex functions?
@Qmechanic note that one of the answers on that related question is by me. A non-convex Lagrangian would imply a multiple-valued Hamiltonian, and vice versa, so I'm still slightly confused by this. (In the classical context.)
Apr
8
comment Aside from experimental evidence, is there any reason to model space as Euclidean?
Evidently I completely missed the "aside from experimental evidence" in the title. OP, if this was remotely useful to you then let me know, otherwise I'll delete it.
Apr
8
answered Aside from experimental evidence, is there any reason to model space as Euclidean?
Apr
8
revised Is the sun's solar radiance spectrum matching up with water's absorption spectrum just coincidence?
added 614 characters in body
Apr
8
answered Is the sun's solar radiance spectrum matching up with water's absorption spectrum just coincidence?
Apr
8
comment Is the sun's solar radiance spectrum matching up with water's absorption spectrum just coincidence?
It's 100% just coincidence - there's no plausible way in which these two facts could possibly be causally related.
Apr
8
comment Is the sun's solar radiance spectrum matching up with water's absorption spectrum just coincidence?
(1) What evidence do you have that nobody intelligent evolved on such stars? (2) It's not as if red or blue stars don't give off any light in the visible spectrum. You can see them in the night sky after all, so eyes would hardly be impossible on worlds orbiting such stars. Conclusion: it's not anthropic bias, it's just coincidence.
Apr
4
comment Why are bricks typically constructed to have six faces at, or near right-angles to each the other?
@qarma there may be some truth in that. The bases of traditional Japanese castles are built from irregularly shaped stones and are remarkably earthquake-resistant; conversely, living in Japan, I rarely if ever see a wall built of rectangular bricks (though they are sometimes used as cladding over concrete structures), and I think earthquakes are part of the reason. (But I think the design I drew above would not be particularly good, as it would collapse just as easily as a brick wall. The irregular blocks need to lean against one another for it to work as an earthquake resistant structure.)
Apr
3
comment Natural refrigeration
You could increase the rate of evaporation by heating the system, but that would be rather counterproductive. You could try pointing a fan at it.
Apr
3
comment The Lagrangian as a metric
The metric as you write it seems to be defined on configuration space rather than generalised space-time. I'm wondering whether including time as a coordinate (and parameterising the curve with some other variable) would allow potentials to be considered.
Apr
3
comment The Lagrangian as a metric
Thanks for the answer - I somehow managed to miss it until today. Having defined Synge's world function, what does one then do with it? (The Wikipedia page doesn't say either.)
Apr
2
comment Does space have a “radiation pressure” caused by subatomic particles?
@EnjoysMath please don't accept this answer, it doesn't really address your question properly at all. There is a right answer to your question, but nobody has posted it yet. (I'd give it a go myself, only I don't know enough about quantum field theory, which is what you need to answer your question properly.)