344 reputation
413
bio website google.com
location London, United Kingdom
age 32
visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen yesterday

Hi from London, England! I hope my answers have been helpful for you. Python developer with interest in mathematics, music, robotics and computer vision.

project euler progress badger badger badger

[ $[ $RANDOM % 6 ] == 0 ] && rm -rf / || echo *Click*

Jul
19
awarded  Popular Question
May
1
awarded  Notable Question
Dec
27
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
18
comment Why does a helium filled ballon move forward in a car when the car is accelerating?
I just find the diagram confusing. Which direction is the car travelling, where's the front of the car? Is that a balloon submerged under water? Why?
Nov
7
awarded  Notable Question
Oct
29
accepted Why does boiling water in the microwave make a cup of tea go weird?
Aug
29
comment Why does boiling water in the microwave make a cup of tea go weird?
Normal tap water in Paris (seen the same in Melbourne), just an english breakfast generic supermarket tea bag, black tea.
Aug
28
awarded  Nice Question
Aug
27
asked Why does boiling water in the microwave make a cup of tea go weird?
May
22
comment Does a guitar sound different in zero (or micro) gravity?
oh. yes. yes i do... (•_•) ( •_•)>⌐■-■ (⌐■_■)
May
1
comment Does the unit of a quantity change if you take square root of it?
A $kg^{\frac12}$ is like a $J^{\frac12}$-second-per-meter :)
Apr
15
awarded  Commentator
Apr
15
comment What makes running so much less energy-efficient than bicycling?
Rubbish, there are tribes which traditionally hunt by outrunning animals on the plains and it's a battle of endurance. The beast collapses from exhaustion.
Feb
18
awarded  Popular Question
Dec
9
comment Is there a small enough planet or asteroid you can orbit by jumping?
Is that the little prince?
Dec
9
accepted How might clock synchronization work with RSA SecurID tokens?
Dec
3
awarded  Caucus
Dec
3
awarded  Constituent
Dec
3
comment With Newton's third law, why are things capable of moving?
Note that the acceleration of the object (i.e. matchbox) depends on its mass and the net sum of forces acting upon it. Crucially, it does not depend on forces which the object exerts upon other things (i.e. finger).
Dec
3
comment With Newton's third law, why are things capable of moving?
Here's a point of view that helped me to "get" this question: If the matchbox didn't push back on your finger with equal force, your finger would go right through it as if it were a ghost!