1,679 reputation
615
bio website markbeadles.com
location Columbus, OH
age 47
visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen Jan 28 '13 at 17:55

Feb
15
answered 17 Joules of Energy From a Mouse Trap
Feb
13
revised If an anti-matter singularity and a normal matter singularity, of equal masses, collided would we (outside the event horizon) see an explosion?
deleted 2 characters in body
Feb
13
comment If an anti-matter singularity and a normal matter singularity, of equal masses, collided would we (outside the event horizon) see an explosion?
This is fair enough, I will edit my answer. Thanks.
Feb
12
answered If an anti-matter singularity and a normal matter singularity, of equal masses, collided would we (outside the event horizon) see an explosion?
Feb
9
comment units and nature
What you are saying, @RonMaimon, is that basically all the units are like the candela. They're just there to make things convenient for human experience.
Feb
9
answered units and nature
Feb
4
answered Physically what happens during Avalanche breakdown to the pn junction?
Feb
4
answered Physics of the Internet?
Feb
4
comment Physics of the Internet?
This user's profile indicates he is a HS student. I am willing to give him the benefit of the doubt.
Feb
2
answered Are matrices and second rank tensors the same thing?
Feb
2
comment Energy required to reach 1 wavelength
Thanks, @Community♦ for catching my error in the sign of the exponent.
Feb
2
comment Energy required to reach 1 wavelength
As @Martin alludes to above, it's not correct to think of photons as "using" or "needing" energy to travel. They always travel; that's what they do, and always at the speed of light. A photon doesn't need to "reach" a frequency: when it is emitted, it already has that frequency. It's not like a mechanical wave. Photons essentially are energy. And absent hitting something, a photon will keep travelling to infinity.
Feb
1
answered Energy required to reach 1 wavelength
Jan
31
comment What experiment would disprove string theory?
I like the metaphor of the extension of the positive integers to the signed integers as a model for the extension of relativity+quantum theory to string theory. But I think a better metaphor is the extension of Euclid's axioms. It turned out there were multiple consistent (even "correct") extensions of the axioms. But of course, only one extension is "true" (or "real) for any given universe. This is rather the question being asked here: is there any experimental way to know which extension reflects reality?
Jan
31
comment What experiment would disprove string theory?
Your indication of the importance of quantum gravity to this question is a great point.
Jan
29
comment How can I measure the conductivity of a copper rod?
Well, you could always measure the length and the resistance with a ruler and ohmmeter, and just calculate $\sigma=1/(\rho * l $)
Jan
29
comment Why does electron-positron annihilation prefer to emit photons?
Thanks for the clarification, that is helpful.
Jan
29
revised Why does electron-positron annihilation prefer to emit photons?
added 310 characters in body
Jan
29
comment Why does electron-positron annihilation prefer to emit photons?
OK, it was not clear from your question that this was what you were asking, as opposed to the more general question.
Jan
29
answered Why does electron-positron annihilation prefer to emit photons?