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dr pavel im cia he wasnt alone uh you dont get to bring friends theyre not my friends dont worry no charge for them and why would i want them they were trying to grab your prize they work for the mercenary the masketta man bane aye get them on board ill call ittin the flight plan i just filed with the agency lists smee maimen doctor pavelheer button lee juan ovyu first one to talk gets to stay on my aircraft who paid you to grab dr pavel he didnt fly so good who wants to try next tell me about bane why does he wear the mask a lotta loyalty for a hired gun or perhaps he's wondering why someone would shoot a man before throwing him out of a plane at least you can talk who are you it doesnt matter who we are what matters is our plan if i pull that off will you die it would be extremely painful youre a big guy for you was getting caught part of your plan of course dr pavel refused our offer in favor of yours we had to find out what he told you nothing i said nothing well congratulations you got yourself caught sir now whats the next step of your master plan crashing this plane with no survivors no they expect one of us in the wreckage brother have we started the fire yes the fire rises calm down doctor nows not the time for fear that comes later


Jun
21
comment What are electromagnetic fields made of?
@WIMP: Maybe in the end everyone agrees that physics is just model building and refering to something in reality is a problem merely emerging from language and the observation that we can abstractly compute and thereby predict. I think all these rigid designators refer to constructions of the human mind (and these are not even mind independend).
Jun
20
revised When does the “norm of quasi-eigenvectors” matter in calculations? For which physical results are these even used?
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Jun
20
asked When does the “norm of quasi-eigenvectors” matter in calculations? For which physical results are these even used?
Jun
20
comment How much choice did Einstein have in choosing his GR equations?
@Nathaniel: Well yes. I posted the link with the alternative classical theories and there you see some which are metric theories which also have an energy momentum mensor etc. Condition 1 & 2 make them "similar". See this section and e.g. this f(R) gravity equation, which is Einsteins theory if $f$ is the identity, i.e. $F:=f'=1$.
Jun
19
comment What differs string theory from philosophy or religion?
@AlanSE: I agree and would argue that it's sniping religion and philosophy even more.
Jun
19
comment What differs string theory from philosophy or religion?
Don't you think asking so called philosophical questions already suffices for philosophy? Do you even need logical arguments?
Jun
16
revised How much choice did Einstein have in choosing his GR equations?
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Jun
16
revised How much choice did Einstein have in choosing his GR equations?
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Jun
16
answered How much choice did Einstein have in choosing his GR equations?
Jun
16
comment How to tell whether a physics theory is beautiful?
As a side note, the mental picture of physics and theories of different people is also an interesting topic. E.g. I never think of the Maxwell equations as there being four of them.
Jun
16
comment How to tell whether a physics theory is beautiful?
I don't like this question to start with. I'm pretty sure that there is no measure or ordering of beauty among humans and less so universally. So from this pov there can be no right answer and so if an answer gets accepted it frustrates me just more. In the act of doing physics one comes to admire the brilliant minds and so what people like Maxwell did should be dubbed beautiful or beautiful work. But I see no need in working out the differences to another notion of beauty and then judging the second by the first one. A painting is beautiful, but the mere idea of a box full of colours is too!
Jun
15
comment Unexpected potential energy increase during Tic-Tac drop
You should stick to Ritter Sport.
Jun
14
comment Is it possible to study solid state from kittel after taking only one course in quantum mechanics?
I consider solid state physics to be a little unfocused without the help of a statistical physics understanding of thermodynamics quantities.
Jun
7
comment If a fundamental theory exibits e.g. a mirror symmetry, in what sense it the underlying geometry real?
Thanks. (But you don't touch the second question here right? Namely if or how one or both of the manifolds are found in the classical limit as the classical geometry.)
Jun
7
revised If a fundamental theory exibits e.g. a mirror symmetry, in what sense it the underlying geometry real?
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Jun
7
revised If a fundamental theory exibits e.g. a mirror symmetry, in what sense it the underlying geometry real?
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Jun
7
comment If a fundamental theory exibits e.g. a mirror symmetry, in what sense it the underlying geometry real?
@WillieWong: A formulation of the second question would be to ask if string theory can be considered a quantum gravity in the sense that there is a classical limit down to classical differential geometry, especially regarding the extra dimensions. And if so, to what geometry in these higher dimensions does the limit lead? The question come from the observation that there are totally different (mirroring) options with which Calabi-Yau you can start (consider in the Lagrangian) if you go in the other direction, and the conclusion that neighter of will be the limit, or there are more limits.
Jun
7
comment If a fundamental theory exibits e.g. a mirror symmetry, in what sense it the underlying geometry real?
@WillieWong: No, it's more of a mathematical question actually. The viewpoint is basically the following naive picture: You take say the Schwarzschild metric and quantize it to some quantum gravity theory. If you don't look close enough, the quantum-Schwarzschild space would look classical, namely like the general relativity Schwarzschild space. Now the target space in string theory is one manifold and it leads to a quantized theory. But if there are now actually two mirroring manifolds where this theory can come from, the I guess the classical version looks like neighter of these geometries.
Jun
7
revised If a fundamental theory exibits e.g. a mirror symmetry, in what sense it the underlying geometry real?
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Jun
7
comment If a fundamental theory exibits e.g. a mirror symmetry, in what sense it the underlying geometry real?
@WillieWong: No, the fact that the two Calabi-Yau manifolds are very different is the exact reason why I ask. If the geometries in which the theories lie are different, while the observable physical quantities are the same, can one speak of reality having eighter of these two geometric forms? I personally have no problem with giving up any geometrical picture of the world, but it would be interesting to know (if neighter of these two different options are our effective classical geometry) which geometry comes about, i.e. the geometry that we eventually see? Seems like it's not one of the two.