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A duck walks into a bar. Animal control is promptly called and the duck is released into a near by park.

My email is to be found on my website.


Oct
20
awarded  Popular Question
Oct
19
comment Is there any physical quantity that does not have uncertainty?
@CarlWitthoft: I suspect you have two, but I'm not certain about it.
Oct
18
comment Where did Schrödinger solve the radiating problem of Bohr's model?
To answer the question in the title: At the university of Vienna.
Oct
16
revised Nature of decoupling of matter and radiation
formating 10
Oct
16
suggested approved edit on Nature of decoupling of matter and radiation
Oct
16
comment What is divergence?
@DanielSank: Add one, don't complain.
Oct
16
comment Does velocity determine a geodesic?
I remember making this point here.
Oct
16
revised Classical logic in concern with QM Mathematics
deleted 4 characters in body
Oct
16
answered Classical logic in concern with QM Mathematics
Oct
13
comment Laplace operator's interpretation
@jinawee: Yeah, I know, I can't quite remember what it was - probably just a screencap of that second section on Wikipedia I speak about.
Sep
30
awarded  Explainer
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Sep
23
awarded  Yearling
Sep
11
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
11
comment How can we say that a wave function follows schrodinger equation using operators?
If by energy operator you mean that it's a function value of $H$, i.e. $Â=F(H)$, for example $Â:=4H+H^4$, then $Â$ and $H$ have the same eigenfunctions. (I'm pretty sure about this, certainly in the common cases, but not in general. Look up the spectral theorem. Maybe there are pathological functional analysis scenarios I can't think of right now, it happens sometimes. You know, such that if $F$ is ill-behaved, the domain of $H$ and $F(H)$ is different etc.)
Sep
11
revised How can we say that a wave function follows schrodinger equation using operators?
added 5 characters in body
Sep
11
answered How can we say that a wave function follows schrodinger equation using operators?
Sep
6
comment Difference between Hamiltonian in classical Mechanics and in quantum Mechanics
@Wingonafly: Regarding your response to the second point, what you derive from what is a matter of choice. Usually the Schrödinger equation isn't taken to be derived from anything but taking as a starting point. I don't know what you mean by "How do you answer the question about..." because your initial post didn't even include specific questions. A main difference is that classical observables always commute.
Sep
6
revised Difference between Hamiltonian in classical Mechanics and in quantum Mechanics
added 15 characters in body
Sep
6
answered Difference between Hamiltonian in classical Mechanics and in quantum Mechanics