8,667 reputation
1730
bio website en.wikipedia.org/wiki/…
location United States
age 71
visits member for 3 years, 10 months
seen 11 hours ago

BS Mechanical Engr.
PhD CS(AI)
CS Prof (4yr)
Numerous consulting jobs.
15 yr at http://www.pharsight.com
Published book on CS & several articles
4 kids, 2 grand
Pilot(student)

P.S. The picture is a Beta-prime distribution. It shows the program speedup factors you can get if you see a problem twice in 2, 3, 4, and 5 samples.


May
22
answered What is the curve described by the water of a wet spinning tennis ball?
May
21
comment Volumetric flow rate as a function of radius of pipe
@Floris: you put it better than I did.
May
21
comment Volumetric flow rate as a function of radius of pipe
Keep in mind that flow through an orifice and flow through a pipe are different. Flow through a pipe is viscosity-limited, so flow rate is proportional to pressure drop. Flow rate through an orifice is proportional to square root of pressure drop. It also depends strongly on the shape of the entrance to the orifice. Google "orifice flow".
May
19
comment How fast will 1 Liter of 65°C water get back to 20°C?
Not really. This is not a simple subject. Just google "boiler heat loss".
May
19
comment How fast will 1 Liter of 65°C water get back to 20°C?
You don't mention the insulation of the boiler.
May
17
comment Ocean surface mean current flow meaning
Excellent question, and there's also the issue of wind. Would it make sense to filter it, to smooth out local noise?
May
16
awarded  aerodynamics
May
15
comment Numerical modelling of a step function in time in a hydrodynamic system. (Runge Kutta fourth order)
@Floris: The models we make are always idealized at some level - we take that as a given. Since we're trying to fit a model to rather sparse data, we have to keep the model simple enough that the data can say something about it, so the exact mechanism for things that take almost no time is pedantic.
May
14
comment How do eagles fly slowly for a long time?
@Jubobs: It's not that soaring is different from flapping. All birds flap their wings to put energy into their flight, and all birds glide when they don't need any additional height or speed. All birds are able to soar, which is just gliding in updrafts. Some soar more than others, depending on what they need to do.
May
14
revised How do eagles fly slowly for a long time?
added 396 characters in body
May
14
answered How do eagles fly slowly for a long time?
May
14
awarded  Revival
May
13
revised Resistors in parallel: How do I make this rigorous?
added 440 characters in body
May
13
comment Numerical modelling of a step function in time in a hydrodynamic system. (Runge Kutta fourth order)
It's not a deep concept. It happens all the time in pharmacometric modeling, like here. Here's something that may be a bit much. Basically, any pharmacometric model expressed as a set of differential equations has to receive doses at points in time. So the ODE solver runs up to that time and stops. Then the dose is given which, for example, bumps the amount of drug in blood plasma. Then the ODE solver is started up again, up to the next event time, like an observation.
May
13
answered Numerical modelling of a step function in time in a hydrodynamic system. (Runge Kutta fourth order)
May
13
comment Why don't we build helicopter based space shuttles?
Can airplanes fly in no atmosphere? Of course not. There's nothing for the wing to react against. A helicopter rotor is just a wing that goes in a circle. (They are called "rotary wing aircraft".)
May
13
answered Resistors in parallel: How do I make this rigorous?
May
12
comment If atoms are mostly empty space, why doesn't light pass through everything?
True, if you keep in mind that where an electron "is" is uncertain - it is a wave function that is spread out. So is a photon.
May
11
comment Why is paper (or any tailless) airplane pitch stable?
If you see it nosing up and stalling, that means move the weight further toward the front. It needs to be forward of the center of lift, wherever that is (but not too far forward).
May
11
comment Why is paper (or any tailless) airplane pitch stable?
@Cleric: Actually you can choose any point you like as the fulcrum, it doesn't matter. If you choose the CG, the lift of the main wing produces an up torque, and the tail a down torque. (In a vacuum there is no lift.) Go back to the simple aircraft. Now lengthen the back of the main wing until it touches the horizontal stabilizer. Now you have a single-wing aircraft, but it still works, because at the back there is less lift than at the front (or negative lift). The differential lift between front and back produces the torque. A simple paper airplane can illustrate this perfectly.