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Jan
8
revised 2D - What is the next point given a start point, velocity, yaw rate, acceleration, and time change?
edited body
Jan
8
answered 2D - What is the next point given a start point, velocity, yaw rate, acceleration, and time change?
Jan
8
comment 2D - What is the next point given a start point, velocity, yaw rate, acceleration, and time change?
OK, this is like a car. Now the constant rate of turning. Acceleration comes into play. Do you mean the steering wheel is held at a constant angle, so the front wheels are at a constant angle, so there is a fixed center about which the car is turning, in which case the curve is a circular arc? Or do you mean that as the speed increases the steering wheel is turned back toward 0 so as to keep the yaw rate constant? Just trying to clarify the question.
Jan
8
comment 2D - What is the next point given a start point, velocity, yaw rate, acceleration, and time change?
Is this vehicle like a car with wheels, so it cannot slide sideways, or is it like a rocket, that can go sideways?
Jan
5
comment Can the Arcaboard fly?
@SamuelWeir: I'm skeptical too, but control does not look to me like an issue. You can just tilt it with your feet, to turn it or let it accelerate horizontally.
Jan
4
comment How Vision Works
Good place to start.
Jan
2
comment Why does moving air have low pressure?
Here it's more explicit. The air being deflected downward is not just the air below the wing, but also the air above the wing. In particular, anything that disturbs the flow on top of the wing, like a thin layer of frost, kills lift badly. Big cause of accidents. Also this. Note emphasis on top of the wing.
Jan
2
comment Why does moving air have low pressure?
Ummm... Last sentence? Try reading this.
Jan
2
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
31
comment Driving on the moon
++ Yes. But if your runway took the form of a helical loop which then exited upward, you could do it :)
Dec
30
answered Why does moving air have low pressure?
Dec
29
revised wind load (force exerted) on canopy area
Idioms
Dec
20
answered How do I figure out the totally airborne height for a given machine?
Dec
18
comment Equal transit fallacy in viscous materials
@Bob: Here's a very good and easily understood explanation. Essentially the flow is a summation of linear and circular motion (a vortex) resulting in the downwash. If the molecules rejoin there is no vortex. No vortex = no downwash, and no downwash = no lift.
Dec
17
answered Equal transit fallacy in viscous materials
Dec
17
comment Remove measured distribution from another distribution
Good question. You might want to ask it on Cross Validated.
Dec
16
comment Aircraft lift theory vs energy conservation
Drag is a function mainly of speed and angle of attack, and other variables. I can't recommend a better source of information than this. Also, the 747 is very efficient aerodynamically, as are all jet transports. This can be seen in their glide ratio, the angle of their descent under no power. A typical glide ratio for a jet transport is around 25:1, while for a Cessna 172 it is only around 9:1, in a clean configuration. If landing gear, flaps, or spoilers are out, it is a lot less.
Dec
16
comment How is momentum conserved when is is only dependent on mass and velocity, and so many other factors come into play?
@AdamGraehling: You're talking about momentum, not energy, so forget about heat and deformation. Those are conservation of energy, not conservation of momentum. In your example, when you say "no external forces act", that means no friction, like if the cars are on a greased surface. If so, the cars will not stop after colliding - the pileup will continue moving at the same speed as their center of mass did before.
Dec
16
awarded  Revival
Dec
16
revised How is momentum conserved when is is only dependent on mass and velocity, and so many other factors come into play?
added 267 characters in body