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suggested rejected edit on Determine whether the ground state is an eigenfunction of [p] and of [p^2]
Jun
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answered Determine whether the ground state is an eigenfunction of [p] and of [p^2]
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comment What is the process that gives mass to free relativitic particles?
And with it you lose the opportunity to push the understanding of mass beyond the Newtonian level, while unnecessarily adding all the excess incorrect physics as outlined by Michael Brown.
Jun
24
comment What is the process that gives mass to free relativitic particles?
"Drag is wrong". Precisely! Hence why it's a bad way to describe the mechanism. It obscures its real nature. Certainly it's an interaction term, but the gap between QFT interaction and our classical intuition about objects moving through fluids is such a long one that I don't think it's a particularly enlightening analogy.
Jun
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revised What is the process that gives mass to free relativitic particles?
Added "non-zero"
Jun
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comment What is the process that gives mass to free relativitic particles?
I'll add an edit to make explicit the non-zero part, which may not be clear.
Jun
24
comment What is the process that gives mass to free relativitic particles?
How on earth does the viscous analogy capture any of that? It suggests drag, which is plainly wrong. The "Higgs potential energy" I referred to is exactly the interaction term you mention, just put in more layman's terms.
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answered What is the process that gives mass to free relativitic particles?
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