41,374 reputation
356133
bio website inspirehep.net/…
location Duchy of Grand Fenwick
age 44
visits member for 4 years, 8 months
seen 1 hour ago

Experimental nuclear and particle physicist. These days I'm teaching, but I've spent a lot of time on nucleon structure in fixed target electron scattering and neutrino oscillations using reactors and beam sources.

Been reading Zemansky & Dittman's book on thermodynamics recently. Quote: ``The concept of temperature is rich in interpretations and levels of abstraction.'' Nice.


Jul
20
comment How can i only shine/shoot one proton/electron per second?
Related: physics.stackexchange.com/q/76162
Jul
20
comment What are some of the failed experiments to determine electron's position?
You may have misunderstood something important. Every measurement of an electron's position will return a position. It's just that if the electron is in an eigenstate of some non-complementary value, the positions you get from a ensemble of measurements will look as though they were drawn from a random probability distribution.
Jul
20
comment Why are tidal forces pointing away from the Moon?
No, it means that the picture the book offered you is highly idealized.
Jul
20
comment Why are tidal forces pointing away from the Moon?
physics.stackexchange.com/q/121830
Jul
20
revised Determining the spatial imaging resolution based on a pinhole diffraction pattern
edited tags
Jul
20
comment What is the *cause* of the Lorentz Force
A number crunching approach is to compute the translational force and the toque on a magnetic dipole subject to a uniform external field, then repeat the computation for a non-uniform imposed field. Alas I don't think that this is what you are looking for. Related: physics.stackexchange.com/q/170130
Jul
20
comment How accurate is the time on a digital clock versus the time on internet clocks?
Alas the USNO tick and tock servers are no longer publicly available, and the observatory suggests that you use a tier two server near you.
Jul
19
comment Can Maxwell's equations be derived from Coulomb's Law and Special Relativity?
Answers consisting only of a link or recommendation for outside reading are explicitly bad answers.
Jul
19
revised How to guess the correct fitting function to some data?
minor but important word added
Jul
19
comment How does the conductor knows which side is outside?
I assume (and hope) that someone explained to you about the mechanism by which conductors establish zero interior field int he steady-state. The way to answer your own question goes back to the same what-if games.
Jul
19
comment Neutrinos travels through our bodies: do they contribute for gravitational atractive force?
Here is an example calculation I did for solar neutrinos passing through Venus. The short version is that you can safely treat neutrinos as not even noticing planets unless you have a very sensitive detection system indeed. Super-K (a 30,000 ton detector) sees a difference in upward and downward neutrino fluxes due to oscillation but is insufficiently sensitive to notice the difference due to scattering and absorption.
Jul
19
comment Neutrinos travels through our bodies: do they contribute for gravitational atractive force?
"and that the part of this radiation that passes through earth before it penetrate our bodies is somewhat weaker than the corresponding radiation from above" Have you actually calculated the difference? It is instructive to do so. Remember that the elevator speech version of the cross-section is 'a typical solar neutrino only has a 50% chance of interacting in s light-year of lead shielding'.
Jul
18
comment Is it experimentally verified that the neutrinos are affected by gravity?
@john Neutrino mass only implies neutrinoless double beta decay if the neutrinos have Majorana rather then Fermi nature. That is what the $0\nu2\beta$ experiments are working on.
Jul
18
comment Is it experimentally verified that the neutrinos are affected by gravity?
Ah. So all we need to do is place a Super-K sized detector (and it's shielding) in orbit between Uranus and Neptune. Now where is that grant proposal template, anyway?
Jul
18
revised How might we measure the size of a proton? (Without high energy collisions)
added 77 characters in body
Jul
18
comment Is it experimentally verified that the neutrinos are affected by gravity?
At present there is neither the energy nor the angular resolution to attempt such a measurement in a terrestrial setting. No idea if anyone can work out a way forward using astrophysical sources.
Jul
18
answered How might we measure the size of a proton? (Without high energy collisions)
Jul
17
comment Is double-slit experiment dependent on rate at which electrons are fired at slit?
Related: physics.stackexchange.com/q/76162
Jul
17
comment Why does noble gas electron configuration have low energy?
Note that the filling rule minimizes the energy of an entire system, not necessarily the energy of a single atom. That is, if you can considerably reduce the energy of one atom at the cost of slightly increasing the energy of another, you are still ahead of the game and the system can bond.
Jul
17
comment Fundamental question about dimensional analysis
@ChrisDrost Please see thew edit history. Concerning who wrote which parts of the answer.