41,509 reputation
356134
bio website inspirehep.net/…
location Duchy of Grand Fenwick
age 44
visits member for 4 years, 8 months
seen 30 mins ago

Experimental nuclear and particle physicist. These days I'm teaching, but I've spent a lot of time on nucleon structure in fixed target electron scattering and neutrino oscillations using reactors and beam sources.

Been reading Zemansky & Dittman's book on thermodynamics recently. Quote: ``The concept of temperature is rich in interpretations and levels of abstraction.'' Nice.


2d
comment How can we define energy?
The "ability to do work" version is typical of an intro mechanics text and allows you to bootstrap your way through kinetic and various potential energies to understand the more general, but less articulated version that @AdityaBlaze is alluding to.
2d
comment What a physicist can work in after the graduation?
The APS collects statistics on what people graduating with physics degrees do. Lots of technical work other than physics. Computers, engineering and so on. Quant work use to be big and is still available. Lots of general businessmen and women. If you want to follow up by getting a law of accounting degree there are specialties in those disciplines which need domain specific knowledge which a physics degree will prepare you to develop faster than many people.
2d
comment Virtual vs Real image
@Doeser Some possibly useful links: physics.stackexchange.com/questions/6483/… physics.stackexchange.com/questions/14688/… physics.stackexchange.com/questions/192467/…
2d
comment Virtual vs Real image
@Doeser You can put a screen in front of real image, but you don't have to. You can simply look at them as the diverge again after passing though one another. A telescope has two (or more) lenses and no screen if you are going to look through it: you just view the light.
Jul
31
answered How is angular momentum conserved?
Jul
31
reviewed Reject Electric potential vs potential difference
Jul
30
comment Mechanism for inelastic collisions in the particle world
If you are worried about particle "touching" at that level, then I guess you are still stuck in human level thinking. At the deepest level nothing "touch"es in the sense that you mean, all interactions are between fields. See physics.stackexchange.com/q/23797
Jul
30
comment Expression of heat by the Brownian motion
I'm afraid I'm at a loss. You can either try to get hold of the text in question or make some other kind of literature search for "Stratonovich notation". Or abandon the project if you don't expect the reward to be worth the trouble.
Jul
30
comment Will two clocks moving in opposite directions measure the same time as one at rest?
This has the same resolution as the usual twin paradox. Really, it does. Add up the proper time along the various paths.
Jul
29
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
29
comment Bragg's interference
No, but it is important is making it clear why "parallel" doesn't mean non-intersecting. There is nothing wrong with your answer, of course, but the poster was looking at the diagram we draw and thinking about Euclid and non quite seeing how they come together. Huygens' principle is the answer.
Jul
29
answered What is high energy physics?
Jul
29
comment Charge of $W$-bosons in Feynman diagrams
This would be more complete if you noted that this rules work reliably for time-like $W$'s but is ambiguous for space-like $W$ exchanges.
Jul
29
comment Why are electrons alike but photons not?
@Bort You should make an answer of that.
Jul
29
comment Which centripetal force equation should I use for centripetal motion in uniform magnetic field, and why?
@user132522 The is no "the centripetal force" like there is a gravitational force and a electrostatic force and so on. Instead "centripetal force" is a label applied to some combination of forces---the sum of those pointing inward minus those pointing outward. You figure out this combination when you have circular motion, and ignore it when you don't. Which forces go into the combination depends on the problem. In the case of the free motion of a charged particle in a magnetic field, the only force is the magnetic force and it points in so for that problem $F_c = F_{magnetic}$.
Jul
29
comment Expression of heat by the Brownian motion
I don't suppose the first mention of "Stratonovich notation" was accompanied by a citation? Alternately the authors of the paper may have provided that citation in an earlier, related paper. I'd would be helpful to have a link or at least the bibliographic data for the paper.
Jul
29
comment Bragg's interference
This really isn't complete without mentioning that thought we draw rays as lines, Huygens' principle is in place and each of the ray should be envisioned at outgoing wave-fronts with small but non-trivial angular breadth. It would be even better if you mentioned the size of the detector elements.
Jul
29
comment Can sound waves be made to project 3-D shapes, like a reverse sonar?
The phrase you are looking for is "phased array", and they can---in principle---do all kinds of cool things.
Jul
29
comment Has New Horizons' visit to Pluto taught us anything deeper than mere… facts?
I'd like to a put a word in for the notion that the "mere [] facts" that you're so blasé about are more appropriately known as "data", and are kinda important in the scientific process.
Jul
29
comment Why can't we see light travelling from point A to B?
Here's the rub: compute the intensity needed for the original source when you are talking about length scales on the order of light years. Even with a highly (but not perfectly!) collimated original beam, the scattered light is projected into a lot of solid area and therefore falls off with the familiar dependence. So, design the right detector system and that's not a huge problem, but rely on, say, the Mk I eyeball and you have problems.