38,418 reputation
353126
bio website inspirehep.net/…
location Duchy of Grand Fenwick
age 44
visits member for 4 years, 4 months
seen 28 mins ago

Experimental nuclear and particle physicist. These days I'm teaching, but I've spent a lot of time on nucleon structure in fixed target electron scattering and neutrino oscillations using reactors and beam sources.

Been reading Zemansky & Dittman's book on thermodynamics recently. Quote: ``The concept of temperature is rich in interpretations and levels of abstraction.'' Nice.


7h
comment Why does my 1000mAh battery charge faster than the 3000mAh one?
OK. So this is not the simplistic sounding question in the title. In that case you're heading down the rabbit hole and I am not able to give you a proper answer. The short-short version is that every battery technology suffers from a different set of limitation about how you can safely charge it. A potential answerer is going to need more data than you've given them.
7h
comment Why does my 1000mAh battery charge faster than the 3000mAh one?
The question is superficially equivalent to "Why does my 2 gallon bucket fill faster than my 5 gallon bucket?" Is there a particular reason you were expecting it to be otherwise?
9h
revised LArTPC muon sign determination
added 177 characters in body
9h
comment LArTPC muon sign determination
As an aside, do you mind if I ask what project you're working on?
9h
reviewed Edit LArTPC muon sign determination
9h
revised LArTPC muon sign determination
grammar fixes
10h
answered LArTPC muon sign determination
22h
comment Is the present state of our universe due to a bottom up or top down process, or both?
Bottom-up and top-down are adjective that refer to properties of the process. The product of the process doesn't have either property. And yeah, physics is reductionist, but the universe just is.
1d
comment Are nuclear processes the only processes that release more energy than is input?
Consider a spark-plug firing in a piston full of fuel-air mixture. Using the definition of "energy input" implicit in your question the engine in a car releases hugely more energy than you put in.
1d
comment In circular motion, what's preventing me from calculating the circumference of the circle, dividing it by time to find the speed of the object?
If you have the data, then you can do that very thing. But often you have other kinds of data.
1d
comment In circular motion, what's preventing me from calculating the circumference of the circle, dividing it by time to find the speed of the object?
The question to ask your self is: do you have that data?
1d
comment Is it possible that every single isotope are radioactive, and isotopes which we call stable are actually unstable but have an extremely big half-life?
The answer may well depend on the question of the proton's stability (posited to be unstable in may next-generation models).
1d
comment Why are log scales so common?
While Why is the decibel scale logarithmic? has a more specific title at least some of the answers actually address this more general question.
2d
comment Can I become an engineer and a physicist?
Put it this way: most people who study theoretical physics don't have what it take to actually get support for doing research in theoretical physics. Have independent funding? Well, I guess what you do is up to you. But if you need to get paid for it, then the competition is stiff.
2d
comment Why do lines in atomic spectra have thickness? (Bohr's Model)
Bohr's model was a kludge that barely lasted a decade as the model that scientists actually used. It's still taught, not because it is right but because (a) it's easy and (b) it is a stepping stone to a better theory. With emphasis on the easy part. This question was never tackled in it.
Mar
28
revised X-ray background radiation
speling
Mar
28
comment If the LHC-calculated mass of the Higgs is wrong, how long will it take to determine this with confidence?
I'm not sure you understand how big collaborations work. There is internal cross-checking, and grad-students and post-docs have a strong need to stand out (in a positive way!) if they are to get a good job. Being the guy or gal who found a major error is a great way to start developing a reputation as a first rate scientist. There is also competition between different member institutions, so no PI can be confident that of bulling the point. You are positing a conspiracy with 10,000+ participants many of whom are going to be booted from academia in the long run (some are bitter about it).
Mar
28
comment Why does $F=ma$? Is there a straightforward reason?
@garyp I think there is room for multiple interpretations on this matter, but for whatever it is worth Marion and Thornten disagree with you. Their Classical Mechanics text spends some time noodling around the idea of the second law as the (or at least a) definition of mass.
Mar
28
comment Mass-Spring system on an accelerating jet
Flip the question around (so to speak) what if, instead of running the problem horizontally you hung the mass from the spring?
Mar
28
comment Why does $F=ma$? Is there a straightforward reason?
It is worth remembering that physics (like all science) is at its heart descriptive. We seek a set of rules that allow us to correctly describe the world. And while we have some very powerful chains of reasoning that allow us to explain why certain complicated phenomena happen in terms of simple rules the foundation that every single one of those chains rests on is "because the world is observed to work this way". The reason for $\vec{a} = (\sum \vec{F})/m$ is "because the world is observed to work this way".