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seen Jun 26 at 20:31

Aug
30
accepted Jupiter: Zonal Jets in opposite directions
Apr
2
accepted Hydrostatic pressure at lateral directions
Apr
2
comment Hydrostatic pressure at lateral directions
Ah I think I get it now -- "the same pressure distribution" leading to "the same total force resulting from hydrostatic pressure" is a result of pressure itself not being a vector, but being a scalar quantity.
Apr
2
awarded  Commentator
Apr
2
comment Hydrostatic pressure at lateral directions
From the first link, "The sides are identical in area, and have the same depth distribution, therefore they also have the same pressure distribution, and consequently the same total force resulting from hydrostatic pressure, exerted perpendicular to the plane of the surface of each side." Can you care to elaborate on this? I still do not really understand why the pressure acting on the top face must be equal to the pressure acting on the side, directly below the top face.
Apr
2
asked Hydrostatic pressure at lateral directions
Apr
2
accepted Vector Addition — Direction
Mar
27
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Mar
26
comment Vector Addition — Direction
@MichaelBrown, I think I've sorted it out. I think this all arose from a misunderstanding from a physics book thing. Must've been a typo. Thanks though!
Mar
26
comment Vector Addition — Direction
let us continue this discussion in chat
Mar
26
revised Vector Addition — Direction
added 265 characters in body
Mar
26
comment Vector Addition — Direction
So if I wanted to describe a system of forces and wrote $F_1$ + $F_2$ = $F_3$, $F_3$ is in the opposite direction as $F_1$? But then what about $\Sigma F = ma$? with subtraction we'd say they have opposite directions, but then, they don't right?
Mar
26
awarded  Editor
Mar
26
revised Vector Addition — Direction
constrained example
Mar
26
comment Vector Addition — Direction
@Debangshu, yes but say $F_1$ and $F_2$ have the same direction and magnitude, and $F_3$ had double their magnitude, and in the opposite direction. $(1)$ would hold, and by subtraction $(2)$ seems to be logically correct. But then $(3)$ would also be true based on what I said about $(1)$, which seems to confuse me.
Mar
26
comment Vector Addition — Direction
@Debangshu, I'm aware of that, but what of the case where $F1$ and $F2$ are of the same direction? $(1)$ still holds, no?
Mar
26
comment Vector Addition — Direction
@MichaelBrown I don't know, if two vectors have the same direction and magnitude, should they not equate?
Mar
26
asked Vector Addition — Direction
Feb
11
awarded  Supporter
Feb
11
awarded  Scholar