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Oct
13
comment Why Are Maxwell's Equations Preferred Before Those Proposed by H. Hertz?
Please clarify.
Oct
13
comment Why Are Maxwell's Equations Preferred Before Those Proposed by H. Hertz?
This makes no sense: "... the equation you've quoted isn't Lorentz force because there is a missing acceleration term for the moving charged mass". What is that missing term you have in mind?
Oct
13
comment Why Are Maxwell's Equations Preferred Before Those Proposed by H. Hertz?
Of course, the equation should read $ \nabla \times \textbf{E} = -\frac {d \textbf{B}} {d t} = - \frac {\partial \textbf{B} } {d t} + \nabla \times ( \textbf{v} \times \textbf{B}) $
Oct
13
comment Why Are Maxwell's Equations Preferred Before Those Proposed by H. Hertz?
Sorry, can't give page reference because it's very difficult to handle the book as it is given in the link. As for the equation incorporating Lorentz force, I just gave it in my previous post.
Oct
13
comment Why Are Maxwell's Equations Preferred Before Those Proposed by H. Hertz?
@Georg, However, $ \nabla \times \textbf {B} = -\frac {d \textbf{B}} {d t}$ as Hertz proposed is the correct expression because it incorporates the Lorentz force and not $ \nabla \times \textbf {B} = -\frac {\partial \textbf{B}} {\partial t}$ as it is in Maxwell's equations. It dosn't matter how the correct expression was arrived at.
Oct
13
comment Why Are Maxwell's Equations Preferred Before Those Proposed by H. Hertz?
The question still remains. Hertz' theory accounts for the voltage observed in the unipolar generator, Maxwell's theory doesn't. Is there anything which Maxwell's theory accounts for while Hertz' doesn't? If these theories are equivalent in this respect then Hertz' is superior becuse it accounts for all known facts from physical experiments.
Oct
12
comment Why Are Maxwell's Equations Preferred Before Those Proposed by H. Hertz?
Whether or not Hertz thinks this or that is absolutely immaterial. What really matters is what follows from the equations. Does it really follow that Hertz' equations accout for all known experimental facts in EM while Maxwell's don't?
Oct
12
comment Why Are Maxwell's Equations Preferred Before Those Proposed by H. Hertz?
So, FrnakH, what is superior, a theory that resorts to patches or a theory that can account for the results of all known experiments? The point is that, if it is thrue that Hertz' theory indeed account for all experimental facts then that't a superior theory, right?
Oct
12
asked Why Are Maxwell's Equations Preferred Before Those Proposed by H. Hertz?