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8h
reviewed Close In 2D CFT, is there a name for a field with the following OPE?
8h
comment In 2D CFT, is there a name for a field with the following OPE?
Why would that be an interesting thing to look at? It's not the form of the OPE that makes a primary field interesting, it's the fact that it is of lowest/highest weight in a representation of the Virasoro algebra, and hence all other fields/states can be obtained from it by acting with the Virasoro generators.
8h
reviewed Close De-broglie wavelength
21h
reviewed Edit vacuum tag wiki excerpt
21h
revised vacuum wiki excerpt
markdown doesn't work in excerpts
21h
reviewed Edit commutator tag wiki excerpt
21h
revised commutator wiki excerpt
"algebra" and "quantum field theory" are not proper nouns
21h
answered Why use vectors to describe velocity/force/etc instead of treating magnitude and direction as separate values?
21h
comment Is climate change caused by humans?
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because if it is mainstream, then you're asking us "Is this mainstream climate science argument right?", which is the task of the scientific process and not an SE site to decide, and if it is fringe, the question is off-topic because we don't deal in debunking non-mainstream physics here.
21h
comment Is climate change caused by humans?
@DanielSank: Normal users cannot protect questions younger than two days (don't ask me why).
22h
comment Is climate change caused by humans?
1. Although atmospheric science is part of physics, questions about climate might be better at Earth Science 2. There is a large body of literature on anthropogenic climate change. I am not versed enough in the field to decide whether or not "global warming is caused by solar cycles" is mainstream or fringe, but if it is mainsteam, then you're asking us "Is this mainstream climate science argument right?", which is the task of the scientific process and not an SE site to decide, and if it is fringe, the question is off-topic because we don't deal in debunking non-mainstream physics here.
23h
comment The question of the protein and the ribosome
Why did you ask this here and not at Biology? I don't see how this is supposed to be physics.
23h
comment Does a set of eigenvalues in QM correspond to a random variable in statistics?
If you only have one observable, then everything commutes (the projectors onto the eigenspaces commute because their product is zero), and you indeed get back classical/commutative probability. I maintain this is all in the answer - you just have to read it.
1d
comment Does a set of eigenvalues in QM correspond to a random variable in statistics?
Look at the proposition $P$: "The $x$-value of the spin is $1/2$" - that is the statement that the observable $\sigma_x$ takes a certain eigenvalue. He doesn't explicitly say it, but most propositions you will consider in practice are of course statements about the values of observables, and hence eigenvalues.
1d
comment Does a set of eigenvalues in QM correspond to a random variable in statistics?
I'm not sure how this is different from your other question, and how this is not also answered by the duplicate linked there. "Having an eigenvalue $\phi_j$" is precisely the type of proposition that ValterMoretti considers in his answer.
1d
comment Orbital angular momentum eigenstates in the $|\mathbf{r}\rangle$ representation
I'm not sure what exactly is unclear to you here. You know the spectrum fo $L_z$ and $L^2$. The $\psi_{l,m}$ are eigenfunctions for each possible eigenvalue. So why do you claim that there could be non-separable eigenfunctions? Writing a general non-separable function as $\sum_i f_i(r) Y^{l_i}_{m_i}(\theta,\phi)$, you should be able to see that only the separable ones are eigenfunctions.
1d
comment How the sun can burn that long?
Did you try e.g. reading the Wikipedia article on the sun, or on stars in general?
1d
comment Entanglement in laser beams
This could use a lot more detail. What exactly is the experimental setup here? What does "higher level of entanglement mean"? Higher than what? What is the measure of "level of entanglement"?
1d
comment One from Landau's Minimum (Macroscopic Electrodynamics)
Welcome to Physics.SE! Please have a look at our homework policy.
1d
comment Reading differential forms
"while these differentials usually are multiplied and divided by each other as if they were real numbers."...note that physicists always do that. They do it in GR when writing $\mathrm{d}s^2$ for the metric and then dividing that by $\mathrm{d}t^2$, they do it when solving differential equations by multiplying with $\mathrm{d}t$, they do it when deriving the form of a volume element, and I'm sure I can come up with more examples. And we always happily integrate the results. It's nothing special to thermodynamics.