3,301 reputation
824
bio website N/A
location Pittsburgh, PA
age 31
visits member for 3 years, 2 months
seen Feb 25 at 0:22

I am currently employed in the nuclear industry and have university degrees in nuclear engineering and theoretical physics. I am primarily interested in science and philosophy but I also dabble in programing, information visualization, and fine typography.


Sep
30
awarded  Explainer
Aug
24
awarded  Yearling
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jun
3
awarded  Nice Question
May
10
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
21
comment Changing the Half-Life of Radioactive Substances
Not appreciably so. Heating any matter to the point where it's constituent atoms were traveling at relativistic velocities due to thermal motion would cause the matter to explode or otherwise disassemble. You couldn't have a solid (or liquid or plasma) that was hot enough to make a difference and have it remain a coherent mass.
Dec
7
comment Changing the Half-Life of Radioactive Substances
@user1247, All translatory motion has the same relativistic effect irrespective of whether it is caused by thermal energy or some other source of relative velocity.
Nov
26
awarded  Notable Question
Aug
24
awarded  Yearling
Jul
8
comment Why doesn't my house get misty?
I don't have time to go into all of the details, I expect someone else will get to it later, but there certainly can be fog/clouds inside. An artist named Berndnaut Smilde has used this to great effect: booooooom.com/2012/06/09/…
Jun
24
revised What causes matter to initially rotate/spin/orbit?
deleted 2 characters in body
Jun
24
comment Can you suggest me some good resource for learning Mathematica for physics?
Try sagemath, it's free and, in my opinion, superior.
Jun
20
revised What causes matter to initially rotate/spin/orbit?
added 809 characters in body
Jun
20
answered What causes matter to initially rotate/spin/orbit?
Jun
7
comment From the top of a 400 m high rock by the sea, a ball is shot out in the horizontal direction. The ball speed is 100 m / s
The forum rules state that homework problems should describe what approaches have been tried and which aspects of the problem are proving difficult. Answers to homework problems are supposed to guide the questioner to the correct method, rather than answering the question directly.
Jun
3
comment Application of Calculus in Physics
I disagree with the assertion that "most of the quantities are not continuous." There are a large number of continuous quantities in classical, quantum, and relativistic physics. As Greg said, energy is just one such quantity, but so are position/length/volume, and time. Wave equations are also calculated using calculus.
May
23
comment What is the distance traveled
The situation is complex because you are trying to deduce information without measuring several very important variables. You are trying to predict the effect of the horizontal component of an unknown and inconsistant force acting for an unspecified amount of time. If you want to see how dynamics applies to the real world, start with simple falling bodies, or, better still, simple balls rolling down inclined planes.
May
22
comment What is the distance traveled
This is a very complex situation that will be quite difficult to analyze for someone who is new to the subject. The vertical movement comes from transfering the downward force of your finger to the center of mass of the coin via a lever with the fulcrum at the corner of the laptop. Rather than calculating where the coin will land, you might try measuring the time of flight and calculating the downward force imparted by your finger.
May
14
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
9
revised Why is the total interaction cross section larger for incident particles with lower energy?
modified for clarity