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Jun
6
comment Yukawa Coupling of a Scalar $SU(2)$ Triplet to a Left-Handed Fermionic $SU(2)$ Doublet
Say we have a Higgs doublet, and a Higgs triplet. Is it possible to produce a Higgs triplet out of Higgs doublet? I mean such that we have a term like $\sim D D T$?
Jun
6
comment Gauge-invariant field strength term in Yang-Mills Lagrangian
@JorgeCampos Cheers, it's crystal-clear now :)
Jun
5
comment Gauge-invariant field strength term in Yang-Mills Lagrangian
Could I ask: what is the link between "proportional to Killing form" and "L transforms like L $\rightarrow g^{-1}Lg$"? Thanks.
Jun
5
accepted Naturalness and experiments
Jun
5
asked Naturalness and experiments
Jun
4
comment Is rotational motion relative to space?
I see, thanks for your comment. :)
Jun
4
comment Are these sites reliable?
Both of them are unreliable. They fly in the face of well established theories of physics that are able to predict, describe and explain experiments and observations.
Jun
4
comment Is rotational motion relative to space?
@RonMaimon, Thanks for your answer. I just want to understand it correctly. In the beginning you said: if you have a deSitter space, it "can't" be rotating. But in the previous comment you said: A lone planet "can" rotate in deSitter space relative to the cosmological horizon. Can you clarify this to me please.
Jun
4
comment Rotation in an 'empty' universe
@kleingordon umm, if we were part of that rotating body, can't we use a Foucault pendulum to talk about its rotation around itself? (I'm talking classical physics. I don't know how to think about this problem in terms of relativity.)
Jun
3
comment Rotation in an 'empty' universe
Since it's rotating around itself, and since it's a massive object (so there's gravity), then I guess yes. There will be an equatorial bulge.
Jun
3
comment Is it possible to have incommensurable but equally valid theories of nature which fits all experimental data?
'philosophical gauge invariance' :p brilliant analogy.
Jun
2
comment Reading the Feynman lectures in 2012
I see. Maybe, in addition to Feynman lectures, using a modern physics textbook could be a good idea. I think some new textbooks have special websites for extended and interactive learning. Also, MIT and other great universities provide free video lectures given by well-known physicists.
Jun
2
answered Reading the Feynman lectures in 2012
May
31
comment Calculation of the cross section
I was thinking about this question but decided to look it up before asking. As usual, Lubos and his great answers. Many thanks for your answer. I learned a lot from you in this forum.
May
29
comment Wasn't the Hawking Paradox solved by Einstein?
This issue is much more sophisticated than you think. However, since there are real physicists here, I won't dare attempting at answering the question (maybe next year!) So, let's wait for someone to clear the fog of confusion here. Meanwhile, I suggest you read this article: iopscience.iop.org/1742-6596/171/1/012009
May
29
revised Where can I find beginner's information about quantum mechanics?
added 180 characters in body
May
29
answered Where can I find beginner's information about quantum mechanics?
May
29
accepted 125 Higgs is large (or small) for the MSSM?
May
29
accepted Origin of the Higgs field
May
28
comment Origin of the Higgs field
I didn't say it's not a bosonic field. My suggestion is based on the fact that the Higgs-boson usually refers to the massive scalar not the Higgs field. And thanks for considering my suggestion.