Reputation
7,068
Next privilege 10,000 Rep.
Access moderator tools
Badges
3 16 41
Impact
~138k people reached

5h
comment If a battery is open on one end but connected on the other, does it raise the potential on the connected end?
The battery is made to maintain a specific voltage. It will stay at the prescribed value in a circuit or not
Apr
29
comment How do I use a free body diagram in this case?
If you do want to consider the m1 box alone, then you can still make the free-body diagram with the extra horizontal friction force. But since this friction force is unknown you need one more equation. So in this case, you must make a free body diagram on m2 as well, where this friction is also present (but in the opposite direction). Setting up Newton's second law for each of them gives two equations with this friction force and acceleration as the unknowns, and then it can be solved.
Apr
29
comment How do I use a free body diagram in this case?
If the first diagram shows the boxes stuck to each other, then there is a horizontal friction force as well. You do not have to consider that though, since this can be seen as one whole system as described in the answer
Apr
29
comment How do I use a free body diagram in this case?
@xasthor If all surfaces are frictionless, then you can consider m1 for itself. The free body diagram for m1 will have F horizontally and weight, normal force and the weight of m2 vertically. Put up newton's second law in the horizontal direction and you still only have F, so the equation is $F=am_1$.
Apr
29
comment Is meters per second equivalent to seconds per meter?
"Therefore, is 10 m/s equivalent to 0.1 s/m?" Yes. If you move 10 meters per second, then you spend 0.1 seconds on every meter.
Apr
28
answered How do I use a free body diagram in this case?
Apr
27
comment Can't identify static and kinetic friction regions
[...] whether the slip region corresponds to dynamic friction or whether there is some other mechanism being exhibited, such as stick-slip friction. The "stick-slip" phenomenon is not a new kind of friction but merely a mix of dynamic (kinetic) and static friction. In general $\mu_s>\mu_k$, which may cause a small "jump" when the static friction limit is passed. This might lower the applied force momentarily - just enough for friction to fall below the static limit again. This repeats and is called "stick-slip"
Apr
27
comment Can't identify static and kinetic friction regions
Why would friction change with time? Rather, friction would change with the force that pushed the object over the surface. See the first picture in hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/frict2.html
Apr
27
answered How can gravity have a horizontal component?
Apr
27
answered How does an object with gravitational energy exhaust that energy as work?
Apr
26
comment How can an accelerating inclined plane prevent a block on it from sliding?
Also remember that the block might be pushed in the direction away from the incline, but it will never leave it and "fly off", not even without gravity,sinply because the incline is moving along with it at the same straight acceleration (without gravity it would slide upwards while staying in contact)
Apr
26
comment How can an accelerating inclined plane prevent a block on it from sliding?
These two things happen at the same time. It is not first pushed "into the air" and then downwards. It happens simultaneously so we only see the resulting effect, which is the straight acceleration.
Apr
26
comment How can an accelerating inclined plane prevent a block on it from sliding?
@xasthor Aha. See my update
Apr
26
revised How can an accelerating inclined plane prevent a block on it from sliding?
added 1025 characters in body
Apr
26
answered How can an accelerating inclined plane prevent a block on it from sliding?
Apr
26
awarded  Strunk & White
Apr
26
comment Dot product approaches zero as the magnitude of the vectors increase?
@user3313320 Aha, thank you. I now see what was meant.
Apr
26
revised Dot product approaches zero as the magnitude of the vectors increase?
added 15 characters in body
Apr
26
comment Dot product approaches zero as the magnitude of the vectors increase?
"In one dimension, that 'cosine' term is either 1 or -1" ... Or something in between...
Apr
26
revised Dot product approaches zero as the magnitude of the vectors increase?
Details