942 reputation
413
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location Los Angeles, CA
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visits member for 3 years, 4 months
seen Nov 26 at 20:18

Sep
30
awarded  Explainer
Aug
17
awarded  Yearling
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Aug
17
awarded  Yearling
May
23
asked Phase Space dimension of Lorenz Strange Attractor
Apr
30
accepted Ising Ferromagnet: Spontaneous symmetry breaking or not?
Apr
30
comment Ising Ferromagnet: Spontaneous symmetry breaking or not?
I thought so but wanted to confirm the terminology. Thanks for a simple and elegant confirmation.
Apr
9
comment Phase volume contraction in dissipative systems
I still think that the phase volume must be increase. Of course I am going to assume ergodicity and coarse-graining to stay away from the irreversibility paradox
Apr
9
comment Phase volume contraction in dissipative systems
Do you mean 0 degree C? I mean are we talking about an isolated system of melting ice or one that gains energy to go to 10 C. Since my posing this question a few months ago I have realized that the term "dissipative" is sort of used in two ways: 1) The system loses energy... in that case I now understand that the phase space will shrink (lower energy fewer states) 2) Constant energy but equilibration with entropy generation. I was referring to this definition in my question. In such a case, e.g., ice melting to water at 0 C constant energy
Mar
11
comment Why is electrical energy so difficult to store?
You can store gravitational potential energy in any manner... You can pump water, you can push balls up the hill. I know water is hydro! Please pause before you make comments such as this.
Mar
8
answered Why is electrical energy so difficult to store?
Feb
27
comment Energy equation for an open system
I will also point out that $\delta \dot{Q}$ is not wrong but can be confusing for a student. It gives the impression that it is the change in a time derivative or at the very least a derivative while its neither. Usually in batch systems one tends to write $dE=\delta Q+\delta W$ (ignore the time ) or in steady-flow case one tends to highlight the by writing out $\delta Q/dt$
Feb
27
answered Energy equation for an open system
Feb
25
revised Are there still 'everyday' phenomena unexplained by Physics?
deleted 523 characters in body
Feb
22
answered Why do we need different ensembles in statistical mechanics?
Feb
21
answered Adiabatic expansion of steam through a valve
Feb
21
comment Supplements for Kittel's Solid State Physics?
I absolutely agree with Dylan. I found Ashcroft and Mermin much better than Kittel when I was reading. One other more engineering oriented (device) first-read (a simpler read) could be the book: Semiconductor device fundamentals by Robert Pierret. And finally the book by Ziman will be a great next step from Mermin.
Feb
21
comment Are there still 'everyday' phenomena unexplained by Physics?
Partly true. First, if by mathematics you mean computational mathematics the answer is no (that's the essence of my comments above). On the other hand if you mean our ability to analyze with insight, and solve non-linear equations, the answer is yes. But theoretical physics and math go hand in hand in an inseparable manner. If you are able to express the physics of multi-body interacting systems in good models that render solvability a nice mathematical theory results, but we need good mathematical ideas to be able to model the physics. So its chicken-egg, like always!
Feb
20
accepted Order of phase transition: Which free energy to use?
Feb
19
comment Are there still 'everyday' phenomena unexplained by Physics?
To add to Vibert's comment... or maybe things are just not as reducible to exploit linearity (inherent in any computation effort) as is the case in chaotic systems and we need a different perspective. I agree this is vague, which is why finer and finer computation seems the accepted/only feasible path. But that also suggests we need to keep looking!