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visits member for 3 years
seen Feb 18 at 0:43

Got my degree in physics, but haven't touched it in a while as I switched to computer science.


Dec
4
awarded  Caucus
Mar
17
comment wind vs air resistance
Well, i guess the air could be composed of different particles, say more water for instance, so I guess the density is pertinent, my bad.
Mar
17
comment wind vs air resistance
Isn't specifying both the pressure and the density overkill? Also, I believe you are correct that if we match conditions then it matches, but I was more curious to know if wind is in fact denser.
Mar
17
comment wind vs air resistance
Ah true. I'm thinking of the usual method of wind generation.
Mar
17
asked wind vs air resistance
Aug
26
accepted Should I cook two pieces of Canadian Bacon twice as long as one in a microwave?
Aug
24
comment Should I cook two pieces of Canadian Bacon twice as long as one in a microwave?
+1 for stacking. But it suggests taking into account about the depth that the microwaves penetrate (I've heard 1/8 inch for water.) and the rate of heatflow within the substrate to be cooked.
Aug
24
comment Should I cook two pieces of Canadian Bacon twice as long as one in a microwave?
I'm guessing it's more efficient b/c not all the power is absorbed with one piece of bacon, is that you're thinking?
Aug
24
comment Should I cook two pieces of Canadian Bacon twice as long as one in a microwave?
but I'm so lazy...
Aug
24
comment Should I cook two pieces of Canadian Bacon twice as long as one in a microwave?
this fried my mind. I would think that more mass would mean more power required, meaning longer cooking times... unless somehow the residual heat was still cooking them.
Aug
20
comment Should I cook two pieces of Canadian Bacon twice as long as one in a microwave?
I welcome all forms.
Aug
18
awarded  Scholar
Aug
18
accepted Where does the excess energy emitted by a microwave go?
Aug
18
asked Should I cook two pieces of Canadian Bacon twice as long as one in a microwave?
Aug
18
comment Where does the excess energy emitted by a microwave go?
Thanks for a good explanation, but... Can you explain a bit where this equation came from? Like why would it radiate more with a higher resonant frequency? Did you find it somewhere? Aren't the bars on the front spaced to block a specific wavelength of light?
Aug
18
awarded  Supporter
Aug
15
awarded  Student
Aug
15
asked Where does the excess energy emitted by a microwave go?