This account is temporarily suspended to cool down. The suspension period ends on Aug 24 at 17:32.
1 reputation
477178
bio website
location New York City
age 40
visits member for 2 years, 8 months
seen 12 hours ago

I do not participate on this site any longer, except to respond to comments regarding my own text, if that text is unavailable in another form. I do not accept the political moderation atmosphere here, it is not compatible with open science.


Aug
12
comment Myths in the history of Physics
Heisenberg's matrices were infinite, and it is not clear he would have recognized the matrix rule for them, because they were structured from classical Fourier coefficients, and did not have an obvious linear transformation interpretation until Schrodinger and Born gave one.
Aug
12
comment Is anti-matter matter going backwards in time?
This is interpreting "going back in time" differently than anyone else does. Going back in time, as it is usually meant, requires flipping the sign of the energy as measured along the proper time and the sign of the proper time as measured relative to coordinate time. This operation preserves the sign of the energy.
Aug
12
comment Is anti-matter matter going backwards in time?
The TCP theorem is the reason people say antiparticles are particles going back in time! The "reflection" that gives you antiparticle properties from particle properties is CPT reflection, not "T" reflection. The answer to this question is "yes", and this answer is misleading.
Aug
12
answered Does the Unruh effect violate Mach's principle?
Aug
12
answered Does the lack of modular nuclearity in string theory mean anything?
Aug
12
answered What is a “classical Schrodinger field”, really?
Aug
11
answered determine temperature at which pita bread will expand in a toaster
Aug
11
awarded  Supporter
Aug
11
comment If photons have no mass, how can they have momentum?
@Ben: the "stress energy tensor" has the energy density as it's 00 component, and the integral of that over space is the relativistic mass. A light wave has a complicated gravitational field, because it is moving fast, but two light-waves moving in opposite directions which are at a box gravitate exactly like a point mass with their "relativistic mass" GM/r^2. "Relativistic mass" is just another name for the energy for a person who has not internalize their equivalence yet.
Aug
11
comment Path integral vs. measure on infinite dimensional space
This answer is impossibly misleading: when you say you can handle 4d Yang Mills in finite volume, you mean 4d lattice Yang Mills in finite volume, with finite coupling. when the gauge group is a compact product group. Big deal. The whole problem is defining Yang Mills in a continuum in a finite volume, which is equivalent to the infinite volume/zero coupling limit, and none of the so-called "experts" can handle that.
Aug
11
comment Path integral vs. measure on infinite dimensional space
I didn't say that all the problems can be cured, only the measure theoretic headaches--- defining a sigma algebra on the set of distributions, when you don't know what their properties are a-priori. This approach automatically shifts the difficulties to the places they are real. There is no reference--- it's my own personal view. But I guarantee you that if I ever construct a nonfree field, I will do it within a Solovay model.
Aug
10
awarded  Editor
Aug
10
revised Is there any interacting quantum field theory of massless spin-1 fields expressed locally entirely in terms of F, with no vector potential?
explain why it doesn't really answer the question
Aug
9
suggested suggested edit on Is there any interacting quantum field theory of massless spin-1 fields expressed locally entirely in terms of F, with no vector potential?
Aug
9
awarded  Teacher
Aug
9
answered Path integral vs. measure on infinite dimensional space
Aug
9
suggested suggested edit on Is there any interacting quantum field theory of massless spin-1 fields expressed locally entirely in terms of F, with no vector potential?
Aug
9
answered The Impossibility ( or Possibility) of Solving $N$-Body Problem
Aug
9
answered Singularity-free stationary electro-vacuum solution
Aug
9
answered Is there any interacting quantum field theory of massless spin-1 fields expressed locally entirely in terms of F, with no vector potential?