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seen Jun 17 at 21:02

Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jun
17
answered Nontrivial critical exponents in exactly solvable models?
Jun
11
accepted What is a long-tailed distribution for physicists?
Feb
13
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
14
awarded  Notable Question
Oct
1
revised How do GPS devices work?
added more detailed answer: t vs. dt
Oct
1
comment How do GPS devices work?
@leonbloy: ok, good point. I change the answer a bit to be more correct.
Aug
1
awarded  Yearling
Apr
23
revised What is a long-tailed distribution for physicists?
fixed typo
Apr
23
comment What is a long-tailed distribution for physicists?
@user1504: This is what I was also thinking... This also essentially rules out all power law distributions with exponent from 0 to -1.
Apr
16
comment What is a long-tailed distribution for physicists?
hmm, Not if $p(x) \to \infty$ when $x \to \infty$. The point was to say that if the distribution was increasing, like p(x) = x, it does not have a long tail. Perhaps a better formulation for this?
Apr
15
answered What is a long-tailed distribution for physicists?
Apr
9
asked What is a long-tailed distribution for physicists?
Mar
17
awarded  Revival
Mar
4
accepted Identifying a critical phenomena?
Nov
27
awarded  Caucus
Nov
13
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
10
comment What is the simplest system that has both, discontinous and continous phase transitions?
hm, ok... let me get this straight. The water-vapour transition above critical point is isostructural and there is no latent heat. In that sense, you cannot observe phase transition and separate phases. However, if you measure the volume of elementary cell, you can distinguish gaseous phase and supercritical fluid from each other. Did I understand this correctly? Then the follow up question is: What is the limit in volume per unit cell that separates gaseous phase from supercritical liquid?
Oct
8
accepted What is the simplest system that has both, discontinous and continous phase transitions?
Sep
27
comment What is the simplest system that has both, discontinous and continous phase transitions?
Can you modify this so that there is more values for $\alpha$ by adding higher order terms? E.g. discontinuity when $\alpha' \lt 0$ and second order when $\alpha' \ge 0$.