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Nov
13
comment Solving Optics problem with and without differentiation result in different results
Completely unrelated, but I just noticed that the lens outline in your image is just slightly wobbly. Was this maybe scanned and vector-traced from a printed version, or did someone actually draw that lens by hand? o_O
Nov
10
answered Why does correlation length diverge at the percolation threshold?
Nov
10
comment Why does correlation length diverge at the percolation threshold?
Related: physics.stackexchange.com/questions/59678/…
Nov
10
answered Solving Optics problem with and without differentiation result in different results
Nov
10
revised Solving Optics problem with and without differentiation result in different results
add missing line break
Nov
5
comment Do the probability density and the probability current density have a unit
By "(probability) current density", I assume the OP was referring to (probability) flux, which would have units of base quantity per "area" (= surface of a "volume") per time. Of course, $A/m^2 = C/m^2/s$ is a unit of (electric charge) flux, the 1/time part is just hidden inside the definition of the ampere.
Nov
5
revised Do the probability density and the probability current density have a unit
added 3099 characters in body
Nov
5
answered Do the probability density and the probability current density have a unit
Oct
27
comment Why does intramolecular hydrogen bonding cause molecules to separate?
Anyway, I do think that this is a pretty pure chemistry question -- it's not really even "physical chemistry", as the term is conventionally understood -- and, given that it already has a good answer, it might in fact be worth migrating. Yes, I know it could be argued to be on topic here too, but IMO the only real argument to be made for that is that "chemistry is a subset of physics, and so all chemistry questions are on topic", a view which I don't really consider very productive in practice.
Oct
27
comment Why does intramolecular hydrogen bonding cause molecules to separate?
@Chris: IME, mods on most sites don't much like being bothered to migrate questions that could've been "self-migrated" (i.e. deleted and reposted on the other site) by the OP. But, yes, cross-posting as such (i.e. having the same question active on two sites) is generally somewhat disliked. In those rare cases where it may be justified, e.g. to get answers from two very different communities (like, say, Christianity vs. Role-playing Games), it's best to explicitly note it in the respective posts.
Oct
27
revised Why does intramolecular hydrogen bonding cause molecules to separate?
swap "intermolecular" <-> "intramolecular"; based on answer and comments, they were clearly backwards; misc. copyedits
Oct
12
answered Is it possible to prove conventional current is always equivalent to actual current?
Sep
30
awarded  Explainer
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Aug
26
answered Why do we fall down when the bicycle slows down?
Aug
1
revised Is it possible to shield a camera so as to record from the inside of a running microwave oven?
this has nothing to do with thermodynamics
Jul
30
comment Why aren't units with powers, like cm³, surrounded by parentheses?
@supercat: The IEC binary prefixes exist precisely for that purpose. If you mean $16 \times 2^{20}$ bytes, write 16 MiB; if you mean $16 \times 10^{6}$ bytes, write 16 MB without the "i".
Jul
29
comment Why aren't units with powers, like cm³, surrounded by parentheses?
@supercat: According to the current ISO/IEC standard, $4\,{\rm kB/s}$ $=$ $4{,}000\,{\rm B/s} $ $\ne$ $4{,}096\,{\rm B/s}$ $=$ $4\,{\rm KiB/s}$.
Jul
23
awarded  Yearling
Jun
24
revised Interpreting Physics Results Regarding Circuitry Analysis (Highschool Level Physics)
OK, let's use vertical fractions for display math (+ misc. corrections)