2,865 reputation
1119
bio website vyznev.net
location Helsinki, Finland
age
visits member for 2 years, 9 months
seen 6 hours ago

I like programming in Perl and C. I know Java and PHP too (I'm a MediaWiki developer), but I can't really say I like them. I keep meaning to learn Python some day, but never seem to get around to it.

I'm working on a Ph.D. in biomathematics. I also like programming puzzles and cryptography.

Please consider any (original) code I post to Stack Overflow (and other Stack Exchange sites) to be released under CC-Zero unless stated otherwise. You may do whatever you want with it and don't have to credit me in any way, although of course that would be nice.


Aug
29
answered Why is a hard sphere gas correlated?
Aug
29
comment Why is a hard sphere gas correlated?
@MichaelBrown: I guess the point it that if the particles are less than two diameters apart, then the closer they are the smaller the gap between them is, and so the more room there is for other particles. Basically, looking at the possible locations of the centers of each particle, each of them excludes other particles from a sphere of radius $a$ around it. But if you bring two particles closer than $2a$ apart, then their exclusion radii overlap, leaving more room for other particles elsewhere.
Aug
28
comment Why do chimneys have these spiral “wings”?
@Kaz: Yes, it's the same effect.
Aug
28
awarded  Good Answer
Aug
28
comment Why do chimneys have these spiral “wings”?
@AlbeyAmakiir: To be honest, I don't know, but I'd guess they might be of stiffer construction, and thus less vulnerable to being damaged by wind-induced oscillations. Really big smokestacks are often built out of reinforced concrete, which doesn't flex much at all; smaller ones are often just thin-walled steel tubes, which do. Or maybe the engineers who designed them just used different safety margins.
Aug
27
awarded  Mortarboard
Aug
27
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
27
revised Why do chimneys have these spiral “wings”?
added 1242 characters in body
Aug
27
answered Why do chimneys have these spiral “wings”?
Aug
3
awarded  Necromancer
Jul
23
revised Symmetry in resistor circuits
copyedit for clarity
Jul
23
comment Symmetry in resistor circuits
Ps. Also, if this question is still considered off topic here, I believe electronics.stackexchange.com should be happy to have it. If you want, you could flag it for ♦ moderator attention and ask for it to be migrated.
Jul
23
comment Symmetry in resistor circuits
Walter: I tried to copyedit the long paragraph @AlfredCentauri complained about, breaking it into smaller parts and rearranging it for clarity. However, I wasn't sure how much I could change without starting to put words in your mouth. In particular, I wasn't really sure if you actually realized, before asking this question, that the reason why you could ignore the resistors between the four identical nodes is that they must be at the same voltage, so I didn't add any mention of that in my edit. Please check the changes I made and fix or revert anything you may find inappropriate. Thanks!
Jul
23
suggested suggested edit on Symmetry in resistor circuits
Jul
23
revised Symmetry in resistor circuits
minor tweaks
Jul
23
awarded  Yearling
Jul
23
answered Symmetry in resistor circuits
Jun
23
comment What are the *necessary* conditions to deterministic chaos?
This is true only for continuous-time dynamical systems. In discrete time, even one-dimensional systems (such as the logistic map) can behave chaotically. Also, even in continuous time, two-dimensional systems can still exhibit (non-chaotic) limit cycles in addition to divergence and point attractors.
May
4
comment Will a helicoper which is hovering inside a closed box move with the box when we move it?
+1 for "box affects air, air affects helicopter". (In fact, if we're being pedantic, even in your "extreme case" the supersonic shockwave will hit the helicopter slightly before the wall does.)
May
4
comment Will a helicoper which is hovering inside a closed box move with the box when we move it?
@BrandonEnright: ...or a fly in a car.