4,928 reputation
11523
bio website vyznev.net
location Helsinki, Finland
age
visits member for 3 years, 4 months
seen 4 hours ago

I'm a PhD student in biomathematics, working on stochastic individual-based models of evolution in spatially structured populations. My other interests include cryptography, programming games and puzzles, photography and graphic design.

I started programming (in AmigaBASIC) when I was 10 years old. Nowadays, I'm most comfortable using Perl, C and JavaScript. I know Java and PHP too, but I can't really say I like them. I also know some Python, but not as much as I'd like.


CC-Zero Please consider any (original) code I post to Stack Overflow and other Stack Exchange sites to be released under CC-Zero unless stated otherwise. You may do whatever you want with it and don't have to credit me in any way, although of course that would be nice.


I'm the main author and maintainer of the Stack Overflow Unofficial Patch (SOUP), a user script for browsers with GreaseMonkey-compatible user script support (Firefox, Chrome, Opera, possibly Safari) that fixes or works around a number of outstanding issues with the Stack Exchange user interface.

I tend to answer a lot more questions than I ask. Some answers I'm rather proud of:


Nov
23
answered Force required to drive car
Nov
13
comment Why does an atom remain uncharged after emission of an alpha particle?
@ratchetfreak: In fact, that is where most of the helium on Earth comes from. That party balloon you bought is filled with the decay products of unstable nuclei.
Nov
13
comment Have we proven that higher dimensions exist?
Hmm, I can think of plenty of meaningful and non-trivial physics theories of the form "X exists", where X is, say, any hypothesized object, particle, interaction or state, and these are, in fact, frequently confirmed by observations (to a varying degree, depending on the reliability and unambiguity of the observations). For instance, the existence of atomic nuclei was pretty directly confirmed by the Rutherford gold foil experiment. Going a bit further afield, there are plenty of examples in, say, chemistry or astronomy (which, if not considered physics as such, are at least very close).
Nov
13
comment Have we proven that higher dimensions exist?
While trying not to get all epistemological here, I should note that theories of the form "an X exists" can, in fact, be experimentally proven true by directly observing an X. In fact, such existential statements can never be experimentally proven false, since it's always possible that an X exists but we just haven't found it yet. (Of course, technically, we can never be 100% sure that our observations of an X are correct, either, but sometimes the evidence can be fairly overwhelming. For example, I'm pretty sure that computers exist, because I'm typing this comment on one.)
Nov
13
comment Solving Optics problem with and without differentiation result in different results
Completely unrelated, but I just noticed that the lens outline in your image is just slightly wobbly. Was this maybe scanned and vector-traced from a printed version, or did someone actually draw that lens by hand? o_O
Nov
10
answered Why does correlation length diverge at the percolation threshold?
Nov
10
comment Why does correlation length diverge at the percolation threshold?
Related: physics.stackexchange.com/questions/59678/…
Nov
10
answered Solving Optics problem with and without differentiation result in different results
Nov
10
revised Solving Optics problem with and without differentiation result in different results
add missing line break
Nov
10
comment Does Newton's third law apply to momentum or to forces?
By now, with all the edits and updates, this question and its answers have turned into an all but unreadable mess. In hindsight, this question would've been better suited for a threaded discussion forum (or perhaps for chat) than for Stack Exchange.
Nov
5
comment Do the probability density and the probability current density have a unit
By "(probability) current density", I assume the OP was referring to (probability) flux, which would have units of base quantity per "area" (= surface of a "volume") per time. Of course, $A/m^2 = C/m^2/s$ is a unit of (electric charge) flux, the 1/time part is just hidden inside the definition of the ampere.
Nov
5
revised Do the probability density and the probability current density have a unit
added 3099 characters in body
Nov
5
answered Do the probability density and the probability current density have a unit
Oct
27
comment Why does intramolecular hydrogen bonding cause molecules to separate?
Anyway, I do think that this is a pretty pure chemistry question -- it's not really even "physical chemistry", as the term is conventionally understood -- and, given that it already has a good answer, it might in fact be worth migrating. Yes, I know it could be argued to be on topic here too, but IMO the only real argument to be made for that is that "chemistry is a subset of physics, and so all chemistry questions are on topic", a view which I don't really consider very productive in practice.
Oct
27
comment Why does intramolecular hydrogen bonding cause molecules to separate?
@Chris: IME, mods on most sites don't much like being bothered to migrate questions that could've been "self-migrated" (i.e. deleted and reposted on the other site) by the OP. But, yes, cross-posting as such (i.e. having the same question active on two sites) is generally somewhat disliked. In those rare cases where it may be justified, e.g. to get answers from two very different communities (like, say, Christianity vs. Role-playing Games), it's best to explicitly note it in the respective posts.
Oct
27
revised Why does intramolecular hydrogen bonding cause molecules to separate?
swap "intermolecular" <-> "intramolecular"; based on answer and comments, they were clearly backwards; misc. copyedits
Oct
12
answered Is it possible to prove conventional current is always equivalent to actual current?
Sep
30
awarded  Explainer
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Aug
26
answered Why do we fall down when the bicycle slows down?