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visits member for 2 years, 9 months
seen Apr 12 at 21:42

Sep
2
comment Where can I find hamiltonians + lagrangians?
@EiyrioüvonKauyf you need to look in a standard undergraduate text such as Classical Mechanics by John Taylor
Sep
1
comment Would it be possible to develop special relativity without knowing about light?
This is pure speculation because we have no idea what sort of society would be created by these blind creatures.
Aug
27
comment Elementary derivation of the motion equations for an inverted pendulum on a cart
What did you use to draw the diagram?
Aug
27
comment Simple Harmonic Motion - What are the units for $\omega_0$ ?
which is equivalent to multiplying the lhs by (1/k)k so you're back to 1(degree) = (k= 180/π)(2πr/360)/r where every thing is consistent since the rhs = 1. But the rhs isn't just the ratio of two lengths, you still need k.
Aug
26
comment Simple Harmonic Motion - What are the units for $\omega_0$ ?
My previous comment wasn't quite correct and I should have said that angle is the ratio of arc-length to radius multiplied by a normalising factor K. You state: 'Incidentally, this also implies that "degree" is just a fancy name for the number π/180". I don't think this is correct because on one side you have the number 1(degree), on the other you have the ratio of two numbers(lengths) where the r's cancel to give $\pi/180$. so you need the conversion factor $k=180/pi$ in $1=k(2\pi r/360)/r$
Aug
15
comment In 't Hooft beable models, do measurements keep states classical?
@annav complex numbers are ordered pairs of real numbers $(a,b)$ that satisfy the axioms of that algebraic structure.
Aug
13
comment Discreteness and Determinism in Superstrings?
@LubošMotl rotations don't commute in classical physics either, but infinitesimal ones do. Isn't it therefore the error tending to zero that matters when commuting observables in classical physics?
Aug
8
comment Simple Harmonic Motion - What are the units for $\omega_0$ ?
I don't think this is right. 1 radian and 1 degree are both assigned the number 1, and both defined as the ratio of an arc length to radius, but using different standards for arc-length. The radian uses the radius, the degree uses the circumference divided up into 360 arc-lengths. Since angle = k arc-length/radius, then $k=180/\pi$ takes care of calculating 1 degree correctly for an arc-length = $2\pi r/360$
Aug
6
answered Why are radians more natural than any other angle unit?
Jul
29
comment How to build a lab at home/school? (general purpose, sophisticated, reliable and cheap)
Labs are built with a goal in mind, not for the sake of building one. Think of something you would like to build and join a science club.
Jul
28
comment History of Electromagnetic Field Tensor
@Ron you're right on this so I'm curious as to which book you got this from?
Jul
28
comment History of Electromagnetic Field Tensor
Thankyou so much!
Jul
27
comment History of Electromagnetic Field Tensor
Is there an english translation of this?
Jul
27
accepted Explanation for $E~$ not falling off at $1/r^2$ for infinite line and sheet charges?
Jul
27
asked Explanation for $E~$ not falling off at $1/r^2$ for infinite line and sheet charges?
Jul
26
answered Why are bricks typically constructed to have six faces at, or near right-angles to each the other?
Jul
26
comment Rotation, cats landing on their feet, and conservation of angular momentum
that only works because of friction which is an external torque and so the momentum of me and the bar stool isn't conserved. Your thought experiment wouldn't work on a frictionless bar stool
Jul
26
comment Rotation, cats landing on their feet, and conservation of angular momentum
sure, likewise for the cat's body you can have one half rotating in one direction, the other in the opposite. But they realign so there is no angular displacement between them, and that's my point. I can sit on a bar stool and twist my body in one direction, the bar stool going in the other. But when I realign my body with the bar stool, I end up pointing in the same direction in the room as I started out with.
Jul
26
comment Rotation, cats landing on their feet, and conservation of angular momentum
do you honestly think cats have a spine where each half of the body can rotate n*360 degrees independently of the other?
Jul
26
comment Rotation, cats landing on their feet, and conservation of angular momentum
but every part in the body of a cat has rotated by the same angle.