1,332 reputation
1620
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location Baltimore, MD (USA)
age 24
visits member for 3 years, 3 months
seen 31 mins ago

2nd year graduate student at Johns Hopkins University in Physics. I'm primarily interested in particle theory and mathematical physics. I have some interest in pure mathematics, especially geometry and topology, and outside of particle physics in other fields including cosmology, topologically protected phases in condensed matter physics, and information theory.

I haven't had much time for this site recently. It's rather difficult to use this site to ask research questions, and it seems there are many people here who are capable of and willing to answer the basic questions which are very common here. If someone starts a new research-level Q&A site about physics (either on SE or elsewhere) I'd be interested in participating.


Oct
17
comment Hopf Algebras in Quantum Groups
The keyword to look for here is Tannaka-Krein duality (e.g. on nLab), a natural extension of Pontryagin duality. Perhaps someone else here is capable of giving some simple explanation of it, but I don't think I can do better than what's already on nLab or Wikipedia.
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Jul
24
comment Is speed of light and sound rational or irrational in nature?
I'm not sure in what sense a system with $c=\pi$ would have "very complicated and perhaps even inconsistent behavior under Lorentz transformations". A Lorentz transformation is simply a linear map on $\mathbb R^4$ preserving the quadratic form $(ct)^2-x^2-y^2-z^2$. Even leaving $c$ as a formal parameter, the theory is exactly what we teach in introductory courses. One can just as easily rescale $t$ such that $c=1$ or $c=\pi$ or any other positive real number; the same theorems in dimensional analysis ensure these are all equiconsistent.
Jul
12
awarded  Yearling
Feb
21
comment How can stars make up 0.5% of whole universe?
Minor terminology quibble: neutrinos aren't baryonic matter. They are, however, ordinary matter.
Jan
14
awarded  Enlightened
Jan
14
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
23
awarded  Tumbleweed
Dec
13
awarded  Informed
Dec
3
comment Operator-state correspondence in QFT
I'm not saying that we never do things like this in physics, but that it isn't exactly what is meant by "local" (at least to me). For example, in the standard Penrose diagram for Minkowski space, past timelike infinity is mapped to a single point, but if you want to talk about local processes occurring in a neighborhood of that point you really have to blow it up to resolve that. There's also a technical issue as to in what sense the limits converge. On AdS this would be a whole different story of course, but in flat space it doesn't make much sense to regard past infinity as a single point.
Dec
3
comment Operator-state correspondence in QFT
@Axion I agree with Prahar's comment. Perhaps another way to say this is that in a CFT, 0 is literally a point, in that we can compute correlation functions between fields at 0 and other points. In an ordinary QFT, past infinity isn't such a thing. The idea of contracting past infinity to a single point seems inherently nonlocal, in that if I send two wave packets back in time in opposite directions in flat space, I expect them to be getting farther away from each other, not converging to the same point...
Dec
2
answered Operator-state correspondence in QFT
Sep
25
comment How to deal with the notation of a function $f$ vs its value $f(x)$ in Physics?
Are you familiar with the implicit function theorem? Many of the "functions" you describe are probably better understood by mathematicians as relations, which can be converted locally into functions via this if you need to do so.
Sep
25
awarded  Popular Question
Sep
22
comment How deep can my knowledge of particle physics go without the maths?
"Physics, by definition, is the subset of Mathematics which pertains to our universe." I disagree with this. There's plenty more to physics than just pure math. I tend to agree more with Vladimir Arnold that the containment is in the other direction: "Mathematics is a part of physics. Physics is an experimental science, a part of natural science. Mathematics is the part of physics where experiments are cheap."
Sep
18
answered Does Clifford algebra depend on the topology of manifold?
Sep
17
awarded  Fanatic
Sep
9
answered Why is the value of thrust for a perfectly spherical event equal to ${\frac{1}{2}}$?
Sep
8
comment What are the physical dimensions (units) of the elements in a Hilbert space of a QM system?
@REX Thanks for catching that. I've now corrected it. I make silly typos like that all the time.
Sep
8
revised What are the physical dimensions (units) of the elements in a Hilbert space of a QM system?
fixed another minor error